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benco132
12-12-06, 10:12
"The illegal act of taking a tap-kick while the attacking players form a line behind the kicker and, as they run forward, passing the ball to one of the running attackers is known as [BLANK].
Correct!
The correct answer is: D.
10.4n : The type of attack known as the 'cavalry charge' usually happens near the goal-line, when the attacking team is awarded a penalty kick or free kick. Attacking players form a line across the field some distance behind the kicker. At a signal from the kicker they charge forward. When they get near, the kicker tap-kicks the ball and passes it to one of them. Until the ball is kicked, the defending team must stay at least ten meters from the mark or behind their goal-line, if that is nearer. A 'cavalry charge' is illegal."

My question is....where do the defending team come into this. As far as this reads, it suggests that it is the attacking team who are infringing?? I may be missing the point completely here (probably), but could someone please explain this in simple terms?!

SimonSmith
12-12-06, 14:12
I assume that there is still an onus on the defensive team to be 10m back. They cannot assume that a cavalkry charge is about to happen.

The way I read it is: if the defence is back 10 and the cavalry charge happens, then the defence gets the penalty.,
If they haven't gone back 10 then they are the primary offence and will be penalized accordingly.
That, at least, is the law interpretation; not necessarily the management way of dealing with it.

PaulDG
12-12-06, 14:12
The way I read it is: if the defence is back 10 and the cavalry charge happens, then the defence gets the penalty.,

Yes. Though Cavalary Charges are rare in the adult game when the defence is 10 back - they're much more likely when a penalty is awarded on the 5m.


That, at least, is the law interpretation; not necessarily the management way of dealing with it.

I've seen too many of these now - fortunately without injury thus far. Now when I award a penalty on the 5m I always ask the SH if he knows what a Cavalary Charge is and when he nods "yes", I say - "well don't do one".

beckett50
12-12-06, 14:12
"The illegal act of taking a tap-kick while the attacking players form a line behind the kicker and, as they run forward, passing the ball to one of the running attackers is known as [BLANK].
Correct!
The correct answer is: D.
10.4n : The type of attack known as the 'cavalry charge' usually happens near the goal-line, when the attacking team is awarded a penalty kick or free kick. Attacking players form a line across the field some distance behind the kicker. At a signal from the kicker they charge forward. When they get near, the kicker tap-kicks the ball and passes it to one of them. Until the ball is kicked, the defending team must stay at least ten meters from the mark or behind their goal-line, if that is nearer. A 'cavalry charge' is illegal."

My question is....where do the defending team come into this. As far as this reads, it suggests that it is the attacking team who are infringing?? I may be missing the point completely here (probably), but could someone please explain this in simple terms?!

Lets talk ideal world. :)

The mark for the penalty has been made and the defending team have retreated the required 10m and are in a defensive line across the pitch.
The attacking SH is stood over the ball with his forwards behind him. At a signal from him, 1 or more of them start to run and when they get close to him he taps the ball and passes it to one of the running players.

Remember that the defence cannot start to advance till the ball has been tapped. This move therefore not only further penalises the defending players, but also makes for added danger by enabling an attacking player to get up a 'good head of steam' prior to hitting the defensive line - thereby causing a potential injury.

It usually happens inside the attacing 22m and certainly when a 5m PK is awarded.

Hope that helps to clarify the cavalry charge.

It is often seen at lower levels and junior rugby where the place kicker lacks accuracy, or the lineout isn't working; thereby precluding the catch and drive option.

spmilligan
12-12-06, 16:12
So, to clarify this, (stupid head on today) if one or more start running before the tap its a cavalry charge. If they start to run after the tap, its not, and the defence may move up.
So at any time the penalty taker taps and passes to a running teammate its a charge. Is that right?

FlipFlop
12-12-06, 16:12
For a cavalry charge the attacking players have to be lined up across the pitch, rather like a horse back charge in the days of Wellington and Napoleon (or even the early days of WWI).

If the players are running before the tap, but not lined up for the charge, but in one large bunch, watch out for the "flying wedge", when they prebind before contact is made (French tactic from the 80's)

But there is nothing in law to stop one, or possibly two, potential receiving players running before the tap. Hence the standard penalty moves of running of a pivot, or two groups running at angles to each other, are still legal.

But that's my tuppence worth.

ex-lucy
12-12-06, 17:12
so, i guess, that begs the questions .... how many men does it take to make a cavalry charge ?

OB..
12-12-06, 19:12
It all depends on the referee's judgement as to whether the play is dangerous or not. The cavalry charge and flying wedge are examples of dangerous play, not definitions of it.