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MiniRef
27-10-14, 13:10
I watched my own 2nds on Saturday. After the opposition scored, the scorer ran back and shouted at his team (about 2 metres from the ref and about 5 metres from touchline) something like "More boys. Let's get these f**king c**nts".

The ref "had a word" and the player ran on. 10 seconds later, another player then used the same language, again within clear earshot of the ref and touchline. I could tell by the ref's reaction that he had heard it but chose not to do anything.

I mainly ref juniors and would not tolerate that language (especially as there will often be young kids there).

But what is the view on such language in a seniors game?

Dixie
27-10-14, 13:10
I mainly ref juniors and would not tolerate that language (especially as there will often be young kids there).

But what is the view on such language in a seniors game? At my school, the school chaplain treated swearing as a penalty, and blasphemy as a sending-off. As you can imagine, this left some opponents bemused. What form does your intolerance of bad language take - and where is your threshold? Do you treat "bugger" the same as F*** or C***? What of "Sh!t" or "Dickhead"? Is it fair to impose your personal linguistic values on opponent who doesn't know the boundaries you set, while your own charges are very clear about the consequences of letting slip an "ar$ehole"?

Even at the higher age groups, you would find that you very quickly lose respect if your decisions are seen as random and (possibly, though unfairly) biased. At adult level, that feeling is magnified immensely and you can very quickly lose a grip on a game. The only LoTG a referee can invoke is Ungentlemanly Conduct - a very moveable feast! IMO, this is best dealt with by an appeal to the players' own sensibilities, pointing out that there are present within earshot people who shouldn't have to listen to such language. If no such observers are there ... then suck it up!

OB..
27-10-14, 14:10
there are present within earshot people who shouldn't have to listen to such language.
I can't define it precisely (a lot depends on tone, attitude etc) but I think a stricter requirement than that is needed. I remember hearing a mother on the touchline, after comments from the coach, forcefully reminding her young son that he "shouldn't f*****g swear" on the pitch.

SimonSmith
27-10-14, 17:10
At my school, the school chaplain treated swearing as a penalty, and blasphemy as a sending-off. As you can imagine, this left some opponents bemused. What form does your intolerance of bad language take - and where is your threshold? Do you treat "bugger" the same as F*** or C***? What of "Sh!t" or "Dickhead"? Is it fair to impose your personal linguistic values on opponent who doesn't know the boundaries you set, while your own charges are very clear about the consequences of letting slip an "ar$ehole"?

Even at the higher age groups, you would find that you very quickly lose respect if your decisions are seen as random and (possibly, though unfairly) biased. At adult level, that feeling is magnified immensely and you can very quickly lose a grip on a game. The only LoTG a referee can invoke is Ungentlemanly Conduct - a very moveable feast! IMO, this is best dealt with by an appeal to the players' own sensibilities, pointing out that there are present within earshot people who shouldn't have to listen to such language. If no such observers are there ... then suck it up!

Huh. School Chaplains. I got routinely told off at school for being "too competitive" and penalized.

crossref
27-10-14, 18:10
I watched my own 2nds on Saturday. After the opposition scored, the scorer ran back and shouted at his team (about 2 metres from the ref and about 5 metres from touchline) something like "More boys. Let's get these f**king c**nts".

What would worry me here is not the bad language per se, but the incitement to violence.
I don't think it's a good idea to ban or punish the use of a particular word, your are just asking for the jehovah sketch from life of Brian
But I might have a word with the captain and suggest the player needs to calm down

Browner
27-10-14, 18:10
I watched my own 2nds on Saturday. After the opposition scored, the scorer ran back and shouted at his team (about 2 metres from the ref and about 5 metres from touchline) something like "More boys. Let's get these f**king c**nts".

The ref "had a word" and the player ran on. 10 seconds later, another player then used the same language, again within clear earshot of the ref and touchline. I could tell by the ref's reaction that he had heard it but chose not to do anything.

I mainly ref juniors and would not tolerate that language (especially as there will often be young kids there).

But what is the view on such language in a seniors game?

Discourage it, ATP usually gets the message across.
Swearing at an opponent is inflammatory and starts a Team warning count as well as a PK , IF, its loud & Obvious (L&O)

Taff
28-10-14, 01:10
While waiting for the KO, I've had an Youth team captain ask me what my attitude was to swearing.

As it happened there was minimal swearing.

Taffy
28-10-14, 01:10
I'm uncomfortable if it is near the touch line. I will tell players "language gentlemen, think about the ladies" and children. Generally not a problem, although when aggressive towards the opposition a different kettle of fish. Yes, I would yellow card for the OP's comment heard. Sets the tone of the game I think.

FightOrFlight
28-10-14, 02:10
Swearing or aggressive language towards an opponent I would speak to the captain about and PK if it happened again.

A simple "ah FFS lads we have to be better than this" I would be inclined to let slide as long as we were not having an 80 min swearathon

Directed at me falls in to 2 categories:

1) "FFS Sir what was that for?" PK and :noyc:

2) "Sir you are an X,Y and/or Z" PK and :norc:

Na Madrai
28-10-14, 10:10
Funny you should mention this .....

I may have mentioned before that I had my annual MOT the week afore last and the only real criticism the assessor could come up with was that I allowed too much bad language with women and children on the touchline!

My view is that, as long as the language is directed at his own players, is not too loud and is not an incitement to violence then let it be! I have been known to make the occasional comment 'Please moderate your language' but alas, nowadays, many people use foul language without even realising that they are doing so - and this includes members of the fair sex!

Whilst refereeing youth level, it is not unkown for me to insist that the 'offender' apologise to a woman/girl standing on the line or take a yellow card. The clear embarrassment is a joy to see and a lesson learnt - friendly matches only of course!!

I also have the occasional drink with a long retired referee. Before yellow cards were in operation, if a youth player swore or even took the Lord's name in vain on a Sunday, he would be punished by being sent off to run two circuits of the pitch!

However, thinking about it; I recently opened a thread concerning my decision to force an injured player to leave the field for the duration. As he lay there, face down, being treated by his physio and I informed his skipper that his day was done, the player responded 'F... off, ref, I am fine'. I chose to completely ignore this - I was after all, imposing my authority over him and ending his weekend's fun but was I right to ignore him?

NM

ChrisR
28-10-14, 12:10
I think that recent generations must be reincarnations of sailors. I tend bar in my local pub and the late night crowd of 20 somethings freely use F, MF (this being the US of A) and C. The women as much as the men.

Back to swearing on the pitch .... Several years ago we were in a critical match against our arch rival and were awarded a penalty when the opponent committed foul play. As the referee was admonishing the miscreant our forwards were loudly grumbling about the foul deed. Our scrumhalf turns to the grumblers and said, loudly: "Shut the **** up!"

Peeeep! Penalty reversed! They nail the kick at goal and we lose by two points.

chbg
28-10-14, 21:10
I recently opened a thread concerning my decision to force an injured player to leave the field for the duration. As he lay there, face down, being treated by his physio and I informed his skipper that his day was done, the player responded 'F... off, ref, I am fine'. I chose to completely ignore this - I was after all, imposing my authority over him and ending his weekend's fun but was I right to ignore him?
NM

Good empathy that recognised the provocation.