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thepercy
05-11-14, 16:11
I accidentally started watching a Rugby League game between England and Samoa. And at just about every tackle the referee would shout instructions, not that weird, but what I though was odd was that he used the players name. Is this normal for League referees.

leaguerefaus
05-11-14, 16:11
I accidentally started watching a Rugby League game between England and Samoa. And at just about every tackle the referee would shout instructions, not that weird, but what I though was odd was that he used the players name. Is this normal for League referees.
It's normal at elite level. You'll hear a player's number used precisely zero times throughout the NRL season. I don't like it.

4eyesbetter
05-11-14, 16:11
The thinking is that players are almost certain to know what their name is and are much more likely to respond to it than the number, which can change. I've had good results on the touchline from learning the wingers' names and using them to pass messages infield; "hey, Dave" works a lot better than "hey, number 2".

Lee Lifeson-Peart
05-11-14, 16:11
The thinking is that players are almost certain to know what their name is and are much more likely to respond to it than the number, which can change. I've had good results on the touchline from learning the wingers' names and using them to pass messages infield; "hey, Dave" works a lot better than "hey, number 2".

Assuming he is called Dave and not Rodney.

crossref
05-11-14, 17:11
I refereed teams where they use numbers themselves, as they don't know each other's name...

SimonSmith
05-11-14, 17:11
Assuming he is called Dave and not Rodney.

"Rodney" would not be playing that dreadful oiks game!

Dixie
05-11-14, 20:11
"Rodney" would not be playing that dreadful oiks game! Quite right! He'd be on 'Ackney Marshes, playing soccer for Del Boy's Dodgy Dynamos.

ctrainor
05-11-14, 23:11
I have a reverse issue. My name is relatively unusual so I regulary get players calling me Ciaran during the game.
Having reffed and played against the same teams for 30 years, they do get to know you.
I do not have a problem with this And i do not want to pedantic and insist that the call me ref or sir.
I do tell visiting teams from out of the county that they will hear people talking to me by name bit to be fair even the teams from out of the county often do as I've reffed at this level for a number of years.
Any thoughts on this?

Phil E
05-11-14, 23:11
I've had good results on the touchline from learning the wingers' names and using them to pass messages infield; "hey, Dave" works a lot better than "hey, number 2".

Why is the winger (Dave) wearing the hookers shirt????

Lee Lifeson-Peart
05-11-14, 23:11
Why is the winger (Dave) wearing the hookers shirt????

The hooker is wearing the scrum half's shirt. Got it?

Shelflife
06-11-14, 00:11
I have a reverse issue. My name is relatively unusual so I regulary get players calling me Ciaran during the game.
Having reffed and played against the same teams for 30 years, they do get to know you.
I do not have a problem with this And i do not want to pedantic and insist that the call me ref or sir.
I do tell visiting teams from out of the county that they will hear people talking to me by name bit to be fair even the teams from out of the county often do as I've reffed at this level for a number of years.
Any thoughts on this?

If you are happy with it, then work away, I prefer ref or sir, recently I had a player refer to me by name late in the 2nd half, I didnt want the other team to think that he "had my ear" so I politely asked him to stop.

Its fine if both teams know you, but the "outsider" team may feel agrieved.

SimonSmith
06-11-14, 00:11
The teams around here know that it's "sir" between the lines, Simon outside them

Drift
06-11-14, 01:11
I don't mind what the players call me as long as the tone is respectful, obviously within reason, however if someone comes up and calls me by my name I am not going to reply with "it's ref or sir" as that is just the height of pedantry IMO.

If I know the player by name and I want to convey a message at downtime I might use their name, especially as after 6 years of refereeing and 3-4 at the 1st grade level you tend to learn everyone's names.

Dickie E
06-11-14, 06:11
The teams around here know that it's "sir" between the lines, Simon outside them

... and "that Pommie p***k" when you're out of earshot? :)

Adam
06-11-14, 09:11
I have been known to use a player's name in-play. I've found "Chris release" works better than "6 blue release".

Probably not compatible with L5 protocol though.

SimonSmith
06-11-14, 13:11
I did once dismiss a South African player for calling me a "****in Engelsman"

I mean. Englishman. Straight red sunshine.

When I'm working with Captains, I try to use first names when I'm at the early stages of managing issues. "Eric, get your guys to stay on their feet... Chris, lets's work on the backs staying onside"

Then, if I have to resort to "Red captain" or "black captain" they know immediately that Something Bad has happened, and they'll react appropriately.

It may not work for everyone, but I find it helps as a management tool.

Accylad
06-11-14, 16:11
At captains brief I say "Chris, Bob (whatever..) my name is Peter. If something happens in the game that demands my immediate attention such as a serious injury shout PETER. I will react far quicker than to a shout of SIR. Don't abuse it but if you need to, use my name" Never had anyone take the mick by calling me Pete all game. I say a similar thing to physios "Clare, if somebody is SERIOUSLY injured and you need me to stop the game shout "Peter stop the game" and as soon as I can I will"

Not sure I would want to be spoken to by my name as a matter of course during a game, and they don't although I think quite a lot know it......

leaguerefaus
06-11-14, 16:11
At captains brief I say "Chris, Bob (whatever..) my name is Peter. If something happens in the game that demands my immediate attention such as a serious injury shout PETER. I will react far quicker than to a shout of SIR. Don't abuse it but if you need to, use my name" Never had anyone take the mick by calling me Pete all game. I say a similar thing to physios "Clare, if somebody is SERIOUSLY injured and you need me to stop the game shout "Peter stop the game" and as soon as I can I will"

Not sure I would want to be spoken to by my name as a matter of course during a game, and they don't although I think quite a lot know it......
What's longer - the pre-match brief or the game?

crossref
06-11-14, 16:11
I don't agree with this, respect has to work both ways.

On the pitch I want the captains to call me 'Sir', so I will call them 'Captain'.
IMO, calling a captain by his first name, but expecting him to call me 'Sir' is treating him like a school boy

In the bar after the game, of course, it's different - first names in both directions.

thepercy
06-11-14, 17:11
I did once dismiss a South African player for calling me a "****in Engelsman"

I mean. Englishman. Straight red sunshine.

When I'm working with Captains, I try to use first names when I'm at the early stages of managing issues. "Eric, get your guys to stay on their feet... Chris, lets's work on the backs staying onside"

Then, if I have to resort to "Red captain" or "black captain" they know immediately that Something Bad has happened, and they'll react appropriately.

It may not work for everyone, but I find it helps as a management tool.

I do the same, and occasionally will use there nickname if that is how they introduce themselves. Although, it was a bit disheartening when the captain introduced himself as "Loco".

SimonSmith
06-11-14, 17:11
UVa Women Captain. "Hi, I'm Seaman"

"No. You're not. If you think I'm calling you that in front of Parent's Day..."

thepercy
06-11-14, 18:11
UVa Women Captain. "Hi, I'm Seaman"

"No. You're not. If you think I'm calling you that in front of Parent's Day..."

Maybe she was in the Navy?

Accylad
06-11-14, 18:11
What's longer - the pre-match brief or the game?

you don't read very fast Leaguerefaus if what I say to the captains takes you 80 mins..... :smile:

Dickie E
06-11-14, 20:11
Chris, lets's work on the backs staying onside"

Then, if I have to resort to "Red captain" or "black captain" they know immediately that Something Bad has happened, and they'll react appropriately.



Escalate from "Chris, let's work on the backs staying onside" to "Christopher, more effort required".

Works for his mother.

Drift
06-11-14, 22:11
I don't agree with this, respect has to work both ways.

On the pitch I want the captains to call me 'Sir', so I will call them 'Captain'.
IMO, calling a captain by his first name, but expecting him to call me 'Sir' is treating him like a school boy

In the bar after the game, of course, it's different - first names in both directions.

What's wrong with having the captain calling you by your name? Or do you introduce yourself as "sir" at the pre-match brief? If so that's already put up a barrier between you and the captain IMO, especially when you are trying to work with him to facilitate their game.

Using their name, and them using yours, can be respectful as it's all about tone.

crossref
07-11-14, 00:11
No of course not.
When I meet the captains I shake hands and introduce myself by name, of course. But on the field they always call me Sir, and I think therefore it is respectful to call them captain
At the pre match brief, with the front row etc, I don't introduce myself. Do you?

Drift
07-11-14, 01:11
No of course not.
When I meet the captains I shake hands and introduce myself by name, of course. But on the field they always call me Sir, and I think therefore it is respectful to call them captain
At the pre match brief, with the front row etc, I don't introduce myself. Do you?

What happens if they call you by name? Do you correct them?

When it comes to the front rowers sometimes I will do, I'll shake their hands individually and if they say their name I will tell them mine as well. Like I have said after refereeing a lot of the players for the last 3 years you get to know their names and they get to know yours. I'll only ever refer to them as a number in general play though.

crossref
07-11-14, 08:11
So far, on the pitch no one has used my name. It's almost always Sir , sometimes Ref. That is the clearly customary around here.
If they did use my name, on the pitch, well I guess a lot would depend on context, wouldn't it, but yes might well correct them.

. I once told my son not to call me Dad on the pitch.!

Browner
07-11-14, 16:11
But on the field they always call me Sir, and I think therefore it is respectful to call them Captain


Match score cards, issued by my Society have a space for "captains name" , & match usage appears standard

I

crossref
07-11-14, 17:11
Match score cards, issued by my Society have a space for "captains name" , & match usage appears standard

I
so on the field - you use their names, they call you Sir?

Browner
07-11-14, 17:11
so on the field - you use their names, they call you Sir?


Post no# 16 Simon ,...............When I'm working with Captains, I try to use first names when I'm at the early stages of managing issues. "Eric, get your guys to stay on their feet... Chris, lets's work on the backs staying onside"

Then, if I have to resort to "Red captain" or "black captain" they know immediately that Something Bad has happened, and they'll react appropriately.

It may not work for everyone, but I find it helps as a management tool.

This isn't dissimilar for me.

TigerCraig
10-11-14, 04:11
Escalate from "Chris, let's work on the backs staying onside" to "Christopher, more effort required".

Works for his mother.

And when it gets to "Christopher Michael !!" he knows he is really for it