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Jason R
10-06-18, 16:06
Hi folks,

I've been a rugby fan for quite a while, and have lurked on these forums as a guest for many years due to my interest in both the Laws of the game and the role of the Referee.
After toying with the idea for a bit, I have finally decided I'd like to learn to become a referee, and have registered for a SRU Level 1 Referees Course taking place at the end of June at BT Murrayfield.
I have completed the Rugby Ready online programme, and am working my way through the updated 2018 Law book, but I wondered if anyone has any hints/tips on what I can expect during this course, and/or any advice on how to prepare for it?
Is there anything particular I might need to take with me (I have not played the game myself, so do not have boots, etc so if these were required I'd need to pick them up before hand)?
Thanks in advance. :)

Taff
10-06-18, 18:06
I assume they will tell you if you need to take boots with you.

If it's anything like the WRU Level 1 course though, it will be 100% classroom based, but I do remember that their e-mail made that very clear.

Flish
10-06-18, 18:06
Not sure if comparable, RFU Level 1 is half classroom and half reffing mini games, on a playground in my case but could be outside so i’d Go prepared

Marc Wakeham
10-06-18, 19:06
I'm sure one of our Scottish refs will be around to help you soon. Well after celebrating the Cricket result at least! That said I'd tale the law book with you both the 2018 and a 2017 if you can get hold of one pen and paper too!! I'd have some kit available Trainers and trackies. On my L1 (WRU) we did a little bit of work outside (setting up rucks and mauls etc). Stuff that your could do inside or out to be fair. I'm sure the SRU will tll yo uwhat you need to take.

Good luck with the course!

SimonSmith
10-06-18, 23:06
American L1 is half class, half live.

And while we're on the cricket...two things, and one will make you feel old. David Sole's lad played in the cricket and Big Gav's lad played for Scotland against Canada.

And second. Just a shout out for Test Match Special. What a great institution the Beeb have given us in TMS. Wonderful radio and podcasts.

crossref
11-06-18, 08:06
First rule out for reffing .. take all your kit, cover yourself for all possibikities :-)

Good luck !

Camquin
11-06-18, 17:06
BTW - Guess who gets to play the mini games your colleagues get to ref?
Keep hydrated.
Have fun.

Jason R
12-06-18, 22:06
Thanks for all your input so far guys. Much appreciated.

Not yet had an email from Scottish Rugby RE what I should expect or take with me, and having not played the game myself I don't have any existing kit to speak off.
Looking at the event page, it appears registration for the course is open until Wed 27th (just few days before the course), so was worried they might not email out till after that, which would only leave me a couple of days to pick up anything I didn't have.

Might just start picking up some basic kit just in case, and if in the end it's not needed for the course, at least I'll have a head start on putting together a kit bag for later.

Marc Wakeham
12-06-18, 23:06
Do you have shorts (football?), T-shirt & trainers. I can't imagine you'll need more than that.

Jason R
12-06-18, 23:06
Do you have shorts (football?), T-shirt & trainers. I can't imagine you'll need more than that.
If that's all I'll need, then yeah I've got those. Guess I was fixating on needing boots and the like. :hap:

SimonSmith
13-06-18, 01:06
Mebbe reach out to the RDO in your area and have a chat?

I can't talk with any confidence about the course; if it's the same as the L1 here, go equipped to run about a field.

If it's "what do I need to referee?" there's about a bazillion threads on that, but we can add to that.

I love the fact that you're trying to get prepared and take it seriously. That fact alone bodes well for you and your future. If you carry that forward to your refereeing - at any level - you'll fulfill your potential.

Relax and enjoy it.

Christy
13-06-18, 07:06
Get a pair of boots that are applicable to your role as a ref .
I find part stub part mould very good .
Dont get long studs , they will slow you down .

Just to be sure , maybe get a gum shield , scrum cap and a kicking T ...

Remember rugby pain is the best feeling out there .
So dont worry to much about that .

Also if you get a shoulder to your head , with no effort of a wrap .
Some on this forum will tell you , its your own fault , because you were too low in your posture . .

Have a great session & buy a good whistle also .

didds
13-06-18, 08:06
i was gonna say - a whistle?

small notepad and pencil (entire threads exist on that!).

make sure your boots are white,. with day glo pink laces. ;-)

didds

Phil E
13-06-18, 09:06
I used to run the Level 1 course here in England.

Assuming it is similar you should get a letter/email before joining with details of everything you need to take, there will probably be some pre-course work as well. In the UK you would need to do Rugby Ready online, World Rugby Online Laws exam, and the online Headcase course. Then download your results and take them with you.

You should go in sports kit with trainers and boots, but if you only have trainers you should be fine, unless its lashing down with rain?
Notepad and pencil. Everything else should be provided if its anything like the RFU course.

But as I said you should get a letter or an email with all the details before the course starts, including location of the venue.

Go with an open mind and enjoy it.

crossref
13-06-18, 10:06
That said I'd tale the law book with you both the 2018 and a 2017 if you can get hold of one

I appreciate it was a light hearted comment, but only on rugbyrefs.com would a brand new ref ever be told that he needed to get both this year's and last year's Law Book !

Jason R
13-06-18, 10:06
...
there will probably be some pre-course work as well. In the UK you would need to do Rugby Ready online, World Rugby Online Laws exam, and the online Headcase course. Then download your results and take them with you.
...

Thanks Phil E. Prior to signing up for the course, it stated that the Rugby Ready online course was a prerequisite, so I have completed that, and have downloaded the certificate.
I have also completed the basic World Rugby Online Laws exam, and the World Rugby Introduction to Match Officiating (Pre-L1) online course, for good measure. However, I haven't come across the Headcase course you mention.

didds
13-06-18, 10:06
However, I haven't come across the Headcase course you mention.

Its an RFU website

http://rfu.com/headcase

Could be that the SRU has something similar they'll ask you to review. But whatever http://rfu.com/headcase would still be useful reading I'd suggest :-)

didds

Jason R
13-06-18, 10:06
Just to be sure , maybe get a gum shield , scrum cap and a kicking T ...


make sure your boots are white,. with day glo pink laces. ;-)

I have a feeling you guys aren't being entirely serious with these suggestions... :chin: :biggrin:


i was gonna say - a whistle?


Have a great session & buy a good whistle also .
I've got an Acme Thunderer 58 on it's way. <style type="text/css">p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #454545}p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #454545; min-height: 14.0px}</style>

Phil E
13-06-18, 11:06
I've got an Acme Thunderer 58 on it's way. <style type="text/css">p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #454545}p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #454545; min-height: 14.0px}</style>

On the RFU version of the course you get given a whistle and a law book as part of the course. Never hurts to have more than one whistle though.

crossref
13-06-18, 12:06
On the RFU version of the course you get given a whistle and a law book as part of the course. Never hurts to have more than one whistle though.

Or more than one Law Book :wink:

chbg
13-06-18, 16:06
Never hurts to have more than one whistle though.

Always carry a spare in one pocket. It won't be a seamless action, but at least it only takes a couple of seconds to get back in the game when you get a plug of mud in your first whistle.

Jolly Roger
17-07-18, 22:07
Hi Jason,

I have only just seen this thread, sorry not to get in touch before.
How did the course go?
I am sure we would all be interested to hear how you found it.

My top tip is to join your local rugby club, if you haven’t already, and hunt out one of the existing club referees. They will all be delighted to help you. Also referee as many games at different levels that you can. mini and midi are great places to start and so long as you are consistent throughout the game and appear confident you will be fine.

All the best, keep us posted on how you get on.

Jason R
19-07-18, 21:07
Hi, yeah the course was great, I really enjoyed it.

In the end it was confirmed that all I needed to take with me was some outdoor kit (so tshirt, shorts and trainers were fine), and a whistle if I had one (they did have spares if not).

Each attendee got a PDF copy of the SRU Level 1 handbook, a physical copy of the 2018 law book and a Crabbie's freebie (under 18's got a tshirt, whereas the adults got a tote bag with 2 bottles of Crabbie's Alcoholic Ginger beer, a key ring and a bottle opener - apparently Crabbie's are the SRU referees sponsor and were keen to support the event).

As expected the course content was a mix of classroom learning, and practical sessions out on the back pitches (it was a gloriously sunny day, so I came home looking a bit like a lobster - us Scots are not used to the big burny ball of gas in the sky). The practical sessions were games of touch, with us taking turns to ref while we covered different topics/concepts and worked on positioning / communication /whistle tone. These sessions also highlighted to me the level of fitness needed to keep up with play, so I'm now working on that along with continued study of the laws, etc.

At the end of the day we had our exam, which was really more of a validation questionnaire as it was open book, and we were allowed to talk to the instructors and the other attendees.

The guys leading the course were very knowledgable, and presented the content well. In addition to the instructors, we also had a couple of chats from the head of referees for the SRU (who repeatedly thanked us for being there and asked us to bring our friends next time), the referee development manager and even one of the top level Scottish refs (Mike Adamson) came in for a bit and gave us his view of a couple of things - this only happened (I assume) as the course was part of a wider SRU referees development weekend.

But yeah overall a great experience, and very helpful. I also managed to get introduced to the president of the local referees society (Midlands), and have been invited along next month to their preseason conference.


My top tip is to join your local rugby club, if you haven’t already, and hunt out one of the existing club referees. They will all be delighted to help you. Also referee as many games at different levels that you can. mini and midi are great places to start and so long as you are consistent throughout the game and appear confident you will be fine.

Since the course I have reached out to my local club (Dunfermline) about joining as a club referee, and am waiting for further info, but they seemed interested and asked if I'd also be interesting in doing some touch judging.

Christy
19-07-18, 22:07
Well done jason .
Attend as many society meetings as you can .
Doing touch judging is a deffinate yes. ..introduce your self to their appointed ref & talk to him / her half time .
Use your society as your open forum & always ask for advice on things you arent sure of .

Mini reffing although will give you a run around .
Wont give you the real experience you need , due to size of pitch & players .
But it is worth giving a go .

Dont get too woried about side line chants ,,and always keep your cool .
And be in control ,, but not a control freak .

If you let lads play rugby ..it will make your job easier .
Well done .
And yes , you need to get fit

Richard smith
23-08-18, 12:08
Jason
As a member of the MDRRS, My advice to you would be this, Get yourself to Society meeting and remember that there is NO such thing as a silly question. The only silly question is the question not asked
The depth of knowledge within MDRRS is immense
If your ever appointed to the Perthshire club Mind and look out for me :D I will be the one imparting helpful advice from the touchline :D