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Gareth-Lee Smith
13-05-07, 13:05
Just watching the highlights of the Guinness Premiership final on BBC and I noticed something I never noticed on the live match.

There's a television decision to be made on a Leicester touchdown (try not given, incidentally), but before that, Dave Pearson forms a 'T' with his hands and declares 'Time out'.

Picky, yes, but that isn't the correct signal for time out, right?

PaulDG
13-05-07, 13:05
Picky, yes, but that isn't the correct signal for time out, right?

Trouble is the correct signal for "time off" is very, very similar to the signal for "try given".

Perhaps something that needs to be sorted out before the World Cup?

Gareth-Lee Smith
13-05-07, 14:05
Ah, good point Paul.

Indeed. Having said that, the 'T' is a universally-accepted symbol of time out and so there was no confusion.

Jacko
13-05-07, 14:05
And it is used in all matches where a TMO is used. No need to sort anything out!

Gareth-Lee Smith
13-05-07, 15:05
So what does the signal actually mean? Because now we have the 'T' and the screen outline signal.

And is it only used in TMO matches? Because in the main the matches we see will be TV-broadcast, and as such are bound to have TMOs. Unless there's a published directive somewhere I'm not sure we can assume that it's used exclusively in TMO matches (not that that's what you've said).

And not that you're necessarily wrong, either

Jacko
13-05-07, 15:05
The T signal means "Time off". This could be because the ref wants to just refer to the TJ, but more often than not it will be followed by the square. The square signal means that he is referring it to the TMO.
It doesn't have to be exclusively used in TMO matches, but would be sensible any time you need to call time off in in-goal when a try may have been scored. Realistically that's not going to happen to us until we get appointed TJs at least.

ExHookah
13-05-07, 22:05
I personally use formal sign language to spell out "TIME OUT" in every match that I referee that has a TMO.

Dickie E
14-05-07, 03:05
there's a photo in my law book that shows the correct signal for "timekeeper to stop and start watch". And it ain't a T.

Jacko
14-05-07, 06:05
Yes, but I imagine that it's your arm raised in the air and the referee blowing the whistle. Compare it to the try signal... Similar??

Dickie E
14-05-07, 07:05
yes, identical.
But its not our role to start making changes on the run. That's Paddy's job. :wink:

Account Deleted
14-05-07, 08:05
We've had senior guys doing the "charades" TV programme signal before going to the Touch Judge. Quite ammusing but you get the point so no real harm done.
I agree that it is important to avoid confusing signals in the try scoring scenarios. The "T" seems to fit the bill.
Paddy is too busy destroyng the Laws to spend time clarifying signals.:nono: :Zip:

oldun
15-05-07, 22:05
I typically do the looks-like-a-try-signal thing and reach up and click the watch with my hand still in the air, same thing with time-on.

Dickie E
15-05-07, 22:05
the tone of the whistle is typically different too. A try is a strong extended blast (with melody if you're good enough). Time-off is a series of 2 or 3 short blasts.

PaulDG
16-05-07, 06:05
I typically do the looks-like-a-try-signal thing and reach up and click the watch with my hand still in the air, same thing with time-on.

So do I. But I don't have 30000 people watching my games (or several million more watching at home) who would misinterpret.

And I can't really imagine why I'd give a Time Off signal when a Try might have been scored. The game will have stopped then anyway and I don't have touch judges to signal to let alone someone in the TV van.

oldun
16-05-07, 13:05
Sorry if I caused confusion (perhaps my own ;-) ) --I meant how I denote "time-off" or "time-out", if I happen to need to call time-off around the goal-line, I try to make sure I'm very discrete in what I'm calling---meaning I will try to blow the whistle to signal a stoppage, signal if there's a penalty or scrum, actually move a step or three away, and then blow/signal for time-off along with loud verbal "time-off", so that the coaches/players on the far side of the pitch, and the one or two spectators/dog walkers can hear.