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tim White
25-05-07, 21:05
Drop goal attempted direct from a free kick-ball goes dead. Is this not just a 22 dropout, why scrum option?

SimonSmith
25-05-07, 21:05
A hotly debated topic.
Most people take the approach that thsi would be treated the same way as if a player punted the ball dead. Pre mise appears to be that if you can't score directly from the FK, then the fact that it is a DK at goal should be ignored

didds
26-05-07, 14:05
if the DK had "gone over" and the ball gone dead what would have been the decision? (given that 3 points is not one of them :-)

Presumably the same sanction would apply?

The scrum back option seems a reasonable call on the reasoning given above.

didds

Robert Burns
26-05-07, 20:05
that would be exactly it.

Dixie
27-05-07, 08:05
One might also consider this; at U.13, an inexperienced FH attempts a drop-goal. The sharp-eyed ref notices that the ball does not hit the ground before or during the kick - i.e. it was actually a punt instead of a DK. The ball goes through the posts, and lands beyond the dead-ball line. What is the outcome?

Even though it was a failed DG attempt, I would offer the scrum as well as the 22. It seems that intent is irrelevant; the ref should officiate what happened, not what was intended.

PS - how can I get a reputation beyond repute, like Robbie?

Davet
27-05-07, 14:05
The law provides that the option of scrum back be offered when there is not an attempt at a kick at goal.

If the result of a "goal" is impossible, not merely difficult, unlikely to succed, or almost imposssible, then surely it cannot be a genuine attempt.

I would offer the option.

OB..
27-05-07, 15:05
Given that I don't see why drop goals merit an exemption anyway, I naturally agree with an interpretation giving the option in this case.

mkottke
30-05-07, 00:05
Given that I don't see why drop goals merit an exemption anyway, I naturally agree with an interpretation giving the option in this case.

I would gather that the scrum option does not apply for attempted field goal is similar to the reasoning for why you can't do a place kick for touch when awarded a PK. Which baffles me, since I have seen players punt just as far as a place kick.

Although, if the option of a scrum is given for a failed kick at goal (assuming the ball went dead), this would probably result in less attempts at goal from mid field. If I were captain and given a choice, dropout or scrum center with the throw-in. The plausible outcome would heavily favor the team that commited the penalty and why should they receive any reward.

OB..
30-05-07, 00:05
if the option of a scrum is given for a failed kick at goal (assuming the ball went dead), this would probably result in less attempts at goal from mid field. Exactly what I want :clap:

The place kick to touch was banned because it took too long, and was used as legalised time-wasting. Some tried to argue that it was more accurate than a punt, but they lost the argument.

Dixie
30-05-07, 14:05
I would gather that the scrum option does not apply for attempted field goal ...
:eek: Outrageous importation of Gridiron terminology into a superior concept! let's have no more of that, please, because I really don't want to have to consider what number a running back or a linebacker ought to wear. Of course, we could always follow our transatlantic cousins and put him in Number 47

mkottke
31-05-07, 19:05
:eek: Outrageous importation of Gridiron terminology into a superior concept! let's have no more of that, please, because I really don't want to have to consider what number a running back or a linebacker ought to wear. Of course, we could always follow our transatlantic cousins and put him in Number 47

Fine - penalty goal

Happy!

I would rather have number 46.

SimonSmith
31-05-07, 21:05
I sense a sticky wicket for Dixie.

Here's the wiki reference:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_goal_%28rugby%29

OB..
31-05-07, 23:05
A field goal was a legitimate method of scoring in rugby up to 1905, when it was removed from the law book.

You simply fly-hacked he ball over the cross bar.

It was rare, never happened in an international, and probably occurred more by accident than design.

The Wikipedia article records an American usage, probably taken from US football.

Dixie
01-06-07, 12:06
I sense a sticky wicket for Dixie.

Here's the wiki reference:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_goal_%28rugby%29


The Wikipedia article records an American usage, probably taken from US football.
Perhaps less a sticky wicket and more a muddy mound? Or a plastic plate?

SimonSmith
01-06-07, 13:06
I'm sure I've heard some of our Antipodean brethren using the referemnce as well.

Dixie
01-06-07, 15:06
I'm sure I've heard some of our Antipodean brethren using the referemnce as well.
That's like saying that a Quebecois colloquialism is grammatically pure French!