PDA

View Full Version : An 'in-the-air' Law?



chopper15
18-03-08, 14:03
Wales v Fr.

In the 2nd half Lee Byrne fielding a long kick to touch from Fr. leaped above Shane Williams, I think it was, who was also waiting for the catch.

Lee caught the ball in the air and collided with Shane who was in front of him just before he landed and play was allowed to continue.

As the ball was the focal point, this contact would hardly have been missed by the ref.

Accepting that the scenario is sequentially correct, shouldn't he have pinged?

Or is there something about a ball/catcher in the air is deemed to be out of FOP and ' ground' laws don't apply?

OB..
18-03-08, 14:03
Wales v Fr.

In the 2nd half Lee Byrne fielding a long kick to touch from Fr. leaped above Shane Williams, I think it was, who was also waiting for the catch.

Lee caught the ball in the air and collided with Shane who was in front of him just before he landed and play was allowed to continue.

As the ball was the focal point, this contact would hardly have been missed by the ref.
There is a well-known refereeing adage: "THe ball has never yet been known to commit an offnce." As a consequence, a referee knows where the ball is, but watches the players.

Not particularly relevant here, but worth bearing inmind.


Accepting that the scenario is sequentially correct, shouldn't he have pinged?

What for?
Law 11.6 (a) When an offside player cannot avoid being touched by the ball or by a team mate carrying it, the player is accidentally offside. If the player’s team gains no advantage from this, play continues.

Dixie
18-03-08, 17:03
Chopper, it's a common misconception that whenever a ball carrier runs into his own team-mate standing in front of him, the referee should blow. If you ask what for, you are usually told either "crossing" or "running into your own man". In fact, neither of these is an offence under the LoTG.

The ref will ping this eventuality only if the man ahead of the ball-carrier obstructs an opponent's efforts to engage the ball carrier. The offence is obstruction. If there is no-one around to be obstructed, or the opposition is not materially disadvantaged, then play continues, as OB notes.