PDA

View Full Version : Binning the Captain



jboulet4648
04-10-05, 20:10
This could go for any repeat infringements yellow card, but we will use the example of coming in from the side to rucks.

High level match, Players know better. Red side is dominant in the rucks. Blue keeps entering rucks from the side. Three offenses have occurred in 15 minutes, and the Captain is told to straighten it out, otherwise I will ;) , Within 5 minutes of this, another Blue player (#6) comes in from the side. Whistle blown, Blue Captain, #6 is in the bin for 10 minutes for repeat infringements....please sort it out, otherwise I will continue to. Within the next 10 minutes, another occurrence, another bin, repeat. If it happens again, I am not going to bin the player, but bin the captain, who is overall responsible for each member of his team? Any disagreements.

I am using sidejoing but this could go for offsides, or tackle infringements easily.

Bryan
04-10-05, 21:10
Three offenses have occurred in 15 minutes, and the Captain is told to straighten it out, otherwise I will ;) , Within 5 minutes of this, another Blue player (#6) comes in from the side. Whistle blown, Blue Captain, #6 is in the bin for 10 minutes for repeat infringements....please sort it out, otherwise I will continue to. Within the next 10 minutes, another occurrence, another bin, repeat. If it happens again, I am not going to bin the player, but bin the captain, who is overall responsible for each member of his team? Any disagreements.

Quoting Law 10.3b:
Repeated infringements by the team. When different players of the same team repeatedly commit the same offence, the referee must decide whether or not this amounts to repeated infringement. If it does, the referee gives a general warning to the team and if they then repeat the offence, the referee cautions and temporarily suspends the guilty player(s) for a period of 10 minutes playing time. If a player of that same team then repeats the offence the referee sends off the guilty player(s).

I disagree with 2 things here. Firstly, I think I'd be looking at pulling out the Red Card if players kept doing this, particularly so close together. After you binned the captain, the replacement captain should be given the schpiel about "you're limiting my options etc etc" and further infringements may warrant a Red Card. 2 Yellow Cards within 10 minutes for the same offence after a general warning had been issued rings alarm bells to me at this level of match.

Furthermore, putting the honus on the captain to sort it out is one thing, but then binning the captain for the actions of his team-mates is nonsensicle. We've all referee'd matches where the captain is actually trying to help you and is giving his team a proper talking-to, and he doesn't need the added pressure if things get this far. He can't control his players anymore than the referee- in fact since we've got the whistle we can control them more! Bin the guilty players, but leave the skipper on the pitch.

-Bryan

didds
04-10-05, 21:10
no, you bin the player.

the captain may be a captain w/out the support of the players - who do not listen to him. he may even be the captain without actually wanting to be the captain!

Carling and the England pack anybody?

didds

SimonSmith
04-10-05, 22:10
Where is the justification in law for binning the captain?

Deeps
04-10-05, 22:10
Judah,

The boys are absolutely right. One of your brief discussions with the Captain should include words along the line of 'I now regard this as a team repeated offence and (shall treat it accordingly/am running out of options etc.).' On the next occurrence then the first yellow for that offence is awarded. I would then make it very clear to the Captain and very publicly so that others hear it too, that the very next occurence of the same offence by any member of his team will most likely warrant a higher sanction. No one should be in any doubt and you MUST be as good as your threat if it happens.

Will
11-10-05, 03:10
The only time I have binned a captain was when one of his teammates threw a punch, and then hid between his players...I called out to the offending player to come forward....there was silence...so I gave them a count to 10, if he did not come forward, the captain would go...he called my bluff, so the captain went!

There was another break in play and would you believe a player from the opposition did the same? this time his captain dragged him over to me and started laying down the law on him before I even started!!!

robertti
17-10-05, 17:10
I find it strange that we are all debating about a law that is so clear and obvious.

When different players of the same team repeatedly commit the same offence, the referee must decide whether or not this amounts to repeated infringement. If it does, the referee gives a general warning to the team and if they then repeat the offence, the referee cautions and temporarily suspends the guilty player(s) for a period of 10 minutes playing time. If a player of that same team then repeats the offence the referee sends off the guilty player(s).

The law is very simple:
1. If a team repeatedly infringes then the referee gives a general warning to a team.
2. If the team offends again a yellow card is used.
3. If it happens again a red card is used.

The situation that Judah is mentioning has not been refereed correctly within this law.
#6 blue yellow carded, no problems. But the player after that should have been red carded. This process and relevant warnings should be communicated to the captain (eg: 'next time is Red Card'). It is one of the few laws that is nice and simple and really should not be hard at all to apply.

It definitely provides no provision for sin-binning the captain instead of the guilty player.

Mike Whittaker
18-10-05, 00:10
Indeed, one can imagine a disciplinary panel dealing with a captain who has personally not committed any offence against the laws of the game..
Regardless of the acts of others it would be dismissed with total lack of credibility for the referee concerned.