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WantToHelp
08-04-09, 19:04
Hi
My eldest (17) has been refereeing most of the season now. He has had a couple of times someone to come along and listen to what he is saying via a radio mic.

He found this really useful and would like me to go along and take notes and listen in (one way therefore). (Yes I do know most of my laws so it wouldnt be that I dont know what is happening.....)

The only system I can find is the Sennheiser G2, is this what most of you use or is there a cheaper system?

Thanks

andyscott
08-04-09, 19:04
Those are the ones I have used in my Society.

Andy

OB..
08-04-09, 20:04
Yes, we use those as well.

Dixie
08-04-09, 22:04
Is your son a member of a referee's Society? I assume he is, and it is the Society advisor who has listened in in the past.

With no disrespect to your analytical skills, the big plus a ref gets from these sessions is not the fact that someone is on the other end, but the feedback you get. This is rarely a function of the communication - it is more to do with positioning, game management, things to work on.

Before you spend big money on a radio mic, I would recommend borrowing a camcorder (if you don't already have one) and videoing him as he officiates a game instead. That way, he can really see what sort of an impression he's making, when his positioning stops him seeing what's going on, and when he's off the pace at the breakdown, and how his signals come acros to the touchline. I would really think this would be much more valuable, as the lesson is there in front of him - it's not a question of "I think you could do this better" coming from a parent who may or may not know the finer points of refereeing technique.

Greg Collins
08-04-09, 23:04
Senn G2 (used to do this stuff professionally and still do as a sideline) is cheapest you'll find and surprisingly good quality for the price. There are better systems out there but for many more beer tokens. Senn kit is robust and warranty after sales is tip top.

SimonSmith
09-04-09, 00:04
Is your son a member of a referee's Society? I assume he is, and it is the Society advisor who has listened in in the past.

With no disrespect to your analytical skills, the big plus a ref gets from these sessions is not the fact that someone is on the other end, but the feedback you get. This is rarely a function of the communication - it is more to do with positioning, game management, things to work on.

Before you spend big money on a radio mic, I would recommend borrowing a camcorder (if you don't already have one) and videoing him as he officiates a game instead. That way, he can really see what sort of an impression he's making, when his positioning stops him seeing what's going on, and when he's off the pace at the breakdown, and how his signals come acros to the touchline. I would really think this would be much more valuable, as the lesson is there in front of him - it's not a question of "I think you could do this better" coming from a parent who may or may not know the finer points of refereeing technique.

Look at it like this.
The communications piece can help round out the picture - it's a vital part of the game. Preventative? Did you use breaks well with the players? How are you communicating advantage?
Cam corders and mikes are the whole package, but I would never turn down a recording.

ExHookah
09-04-09, 02:04
Senn G2 (used to do this stuff professionally and still do as a sideline) is cheapest you'll find and surprisingly good quality for the price. There are better systems out there but for many more beer tokens. Senn kit is robust and warranty after sales is tip top.

Cheap? F**k, it didn't look cheap on the sites I looked at!

Dickie E
09-04-09, 09:04
This is what we use. Cheap but we often miss the first offence.

Dixie
09-04-09, 10:04
Cheap? F**k, it didn't look cheap on the sites I looked at!Probably won't see change out of 500. While this is a sound investment (:clap: ) for a referee's society that will use it week in, week out to review a wide variety of refs, I would question the value for money as a personal purchase.

Simon Thomas
09-04-09, 12:04
We also use the Sennh...... kit at Society and South West Group levels. All have an RFU frequency pre-setting and so can have two or more (Assessor & Referee Coach or Assessor & his 'Assessing' Assessor) using their own kit to listen in.

We bought 12 sets for Society use over last two seasons with kind m sponsors money and ahve proved to be brilliant benefit at all levels.

Cost was 330 per pair (transmitter + mike and receiver plus earphone).

Lee Lifeson-Peart
09-04-09, 13:04
..............

Lee Lifeson-Peart
09-04-09, 13:04
This is what we use. Cheap but we often miss the first offence.

That's one of you lot at school isn't it?

"Yis miss oiv dan me hawmwork - oiv drawn a pickchah of a wombat! With a hat on! Over and out!"

"Cahmon Skip!"

"Tut tut tut tut tut tut tut tut tut tut tut tut!"

"What's that? Wombats dont wear hats? - oh shit!"

Ding ding ding ding ding ding - - - SKIPPY SKIPPY.............

677

Dixie
09-04-09, 18:04
While this is a sound investment (:clap: )


We bought 12 sets for Society use ... Cost was 330 per pair Volume discount (:clap: ). Come on guys - help me out hear (:clap: )!

The umpire
10-04-09, 13:04
have you considered something like this http://www.pmctelecom.co.uk/shop/sports-&-leisure-twoway-radios/cobra-mt6002vp-pmr-radio-twin-pack_mt600/1062

A simple two way radio with a belt clip and microphone socket, This one has VOX mode which means it transmits when you speak, others may have permanent transmit, 5km range should be enough so voice quality should be OK, and a lot less than the professional broadcast quality stuff. Certainly worth looking at.

WantToHelp
25-04-09, 19:04
Thanks for the feedback, appreciate the time. It was going to be a case of cam corder with mic as I believe many mics instead of going to ear could go in to cam corder.
I do take on board that I am not an assessor or mentor or anything like that but have coached at Junior level (so Under 17's and below) for a number of years so kind of know a fair amount about the game. I didnt want it to be two way as I didnt want to distract him but would like to hear about his management etc (something on another thread).
Any input a 17/18 year can get post match is of great benefit and there are not enough assessors/watchers/mentors to go around so was hoping to be able to give more feedback.
However, I do appreciate the input. His first season is almost over. He has absolutely loved it and dealt with a couple of what I would term "bad" situations concerning coaches/teachers and has dealt with them exceedingly professionally and his refereeing has come on. Still a lot to learn of course but many other coaches have asked for him to be appointed over others which I think says a great deal
Thanks again to all

Dickie E
25-04-09, 22:04
wanttohelp,

be mindful that the way to you see a game as a coach/ex player is not always the same as a referee. There are subtleties to the art of refereeing (positioning, running lines, when to play advantage & when not to, when to talk & when not to, etc.) that may be as new to you as to him.

As stated previously, your local Society may be able to resource some sightings.

A couple of years ago I sent a DVD of myself reffing (from Aust.) to a senior assessor in UK (a poster to this site) who gave me valuable & useful feedback. Maybe something like this could help your young fella, too.