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andyscott
22-04-09, 21:04
Ok a slightly strange one for me,

I have been asked to referee a game and one of the team is openly gay.

This in itself is no problem, but I am concerned about any comments made on the park, specifically on the basis of sexualty.

If this was race, then I am happy that any racial abuse would end in a RC, but what about this?

Any pointers?

beckett50
22-04-09, 22:04
Having refereed the only openly gay team in the RFU without any problems I think that you are creating problems before they arise.

However, treat it as you would any other form of verbal abuse.

Dixie
22-04-09, 22:04
Andy, this is a foreseeable, but very unusual, situation and it makes sense to be forearmed if you can. In your shoes, I think I'd take the view that anything gay-ish equates to a bad swear word. So "you pansy" becomes "you c*%t" for the purposes of sanctions. Would I mention it before the game? I don't think so - seems a bit precious.

Beckett50, you're presumably referring to Kings Cross Steelers. Either they're on tour (and the pink pound doesn't stretch as far as it used to) or else Yorks is a hotbed of deviancy as well, in which case the Steelers have lost the tiara of uniqueness:biggrin:

andyscott
22-04-09, 22:04
it's the Newcastle Ravens.

Whilst I do not see any problems, if I get them I prefer to deal with them correctly.

Also the opposition are usually chirpy ;-)

Donal1988
22-04-09, 23:04
There are always somethings that will affect a player. I had a schools derby game where a lad had lost his mum recently and an opponent who knew situation provoked him with a "your mother" joke making the 13 year old cry. I had him replaced for remainder of the game whereas if he made it normally I probably would have given him a warning. Spoke to coach after game and the young fella apologised to him privately after the game.

Banter is well and good and you dont want to single out a player who might already be uncomfotable but I take a strict line to on-pitch bullying.

Mat 04
23-04-09, 01:04
There are always somethings that will affect a player. I had a schools derby game where a lad had lost his mum recently and an opponent who knew situation provoked him with a "your mother" joke making the 13 year old cry. I had him replaced for remainder of the game whereas if he made it normally I probably would have given him a warning. Spoke to coach after game and the young fella apologised to him privately after the game.

Banter is well and good and you dont want to single out a player who might already be uncomfotable but I take a strict line to on-pitch bullying.

Sick. Stories like these genuinely make me wonder do I ever want children...

stuart3826
23-04-09, 07:04
Sick. Stories like these genuinely make me wonder do I ever want children...

They're not all bad:drool:

Dickie E
23-04-09, 08:04
They're not all bad:drool:

yes they are - just some are badder than others :D

stuart3826
23-04-09, 08:04
yes they are - just some are badder than others :D

OK, I'm getting on my soapbox.

I've just returned from a tour with 20 U15 players - Alcester RFC U15's.

Over the entire weekend, not once did any coach or responsible adult have to take a member of the squad on one side to deal with behaviour issues. The boys were a credit to their families, a credit to Alcester RFC, and a credit to the game.

They are not all bad:nono:

Staybound
23-04-09, 08:04
Personally I don't think homophobic comments should be tolerated at all. To me they are on a par with racist comments and should be treated the same. Everyone has a right to play this sport and I believes that referees are one of the pillars that protect that right. If I heard it on the pitch I'd RC it. If I heard one of my young players use it they would be given a severe talking to and a repeat would mean they would be looking for another club.

Simon Thomas
23-04-09, 09:04
Andrew

I think you may be overly sensitive in advance - if openly gay, the player is comfortable with his situation. Naturally you are forewarned and so manage matters accordingly but donot pre-judge and highlight it.

As for direct sexual abuse deal with it in your judgement at the time, if and when it happens (surely highly unlikely) and take the appropriate sanctions (quite word of admonishment, major bollocking, penalty, cards). The higher you escalate it, the more you draw attention to the issue.

It is abuse along with all other types, and unacceptable.

Dixie
23-04-09, 09:04
They're not all bad:drool: Only other people's!

Donal1988
23-04-09, 09:04
Kids are like farts - you can barely tolerate your own!

andyscott
23-04-09, 10:04
Andrew

I think you may be overly sensitive in advance - if openly gay, the player is comfortable with his situation. Naturally you are forewarned and so manage matters accordingly but donot pre-judge and highlight it.

As for direct sexual abuse deal with it in your judgement at the time, if and when it happens (surely highly unlikely) and take the appropriate sanctions (quite word of admonishment, major bollocking, penalty, cards). The higher you escalate it, the more you draw attention to the issue.

It is abuse along with all other types, and unacceptable.

Thanks Simon it makes sense. However it is the whole team, not just one guy, hence why I feel it is more likely to be an issue.

Saying that I very much doubt any of the players will comment. However I was just interested in the comparibility with racism etc. The general consensus here seems to be, not linked, therefore just deal with it as normal.

Andy

Big J
23-04-09, 10:04
Like Andrew I have had the pleasure of reffing Kings Cross Steelers in their early days, their sexuallity was not an issue for anyone involved and I heard no such abuse on the field. I think you are making an issue where one possibly doesn't/won't exist. If i did hear anything like that then I would treat it exactly like a racist comment. In 15 years of reffing I have heard one racist comment.

They were as hard and committed as any other rugby player. I found them were a great bunch of guys who were up for a laugh, their off field drinking activities and banter were something to behold :D

Dixie
23-04-09, 10:04
their off field drinking activities and banter were something to behold :D Two jugs of babycham, please!

Simon Thomas
23-04-09, 11:04
Predictable Dixie - showing your age !

One from the archives (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VuDmO_Vgdc&feature=related)

and the relaunch in 1986 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6s8kpo9IDg&feature=related)

scrumpox2
23-04-09, 11:04
Probably more common in Ladies' rugby where participants are pretty open about their sexuality ... being ladies this tends to be banter and taunting rather than abusive. They're great fun to ref IMHO.

Gareth-Lee Smith
23-04-09, 11:04
Completely irrelevant, but I'm interested has to how an entirely openly-gay squad is formed. Shouldn't think recruitment is easy due to the lesser popularity of rugby, and - I should think - an even lower incidence of gay people prefering rugby.

Dixie
23-04-09, 11:04
Shouldn't think recruitment is easy due to the lesser popularity of rugby, and - I should think - an even lower incidence of gay people prefering rugby.Doesn't seem a huge problem to me. Rugby is the preferred winter sport of the English public school. Any public school Old Boys team probably has a majority of gay or bisexuals among its target population:wink:

Toby Warren
23-04-09, 11:04
Completely irrelevant, but I'm interested has to how an entirely openly-gay squad is formed. Shouldn't think recruitment is easy due to the lesser popularity of rugby, and - I should think - an even lower incidence of gay people prefering rugby.


GLS why would a gay person like rugby less than a straight person :confused:

scrumpox2
23-04-09, 12:04
The nude calendars sell well .... I understand ...

Simon Thomas
23-04-09, 12:04
Completely irrelevant, but I'm interested has to how an entirely openly-gay squad is formed. Shouldn't think recruitment is easy due to the lesser popularity of rugby, and - I should think - an even lower incidence of gay people prefering rugby.

What foundation do you have to support your hypothesis ?
What stats or research indicates any impact of sexual preferences on propensity to play rugby ?

Staggering that in the 21st century such old fashioned stereo-types still persist.

There are gay only male sides in London, North-East and Ulster that I know of, as well as in New York.

In the case of Ladies rugby (my daughter played for Alton, Swansea Uni, Wales and Wasps) and I was (and still am) involved in refffing and coaching Ladies rugby, there is quite a high incidence of openly 'gay' players, albeit not as many as some ignorant commentators might suggest. In her playing career she never had any issues with or from the gay players.

dave_clark
23-04-09, 12:04
Staggering that in the 21st century such old fashioned stereo-types still persist.


especially from a youngster who really should know better.

Toby Warren
23-04-09, 12:04
Glad it wasn't only me who found the question, well, strange.

Dixie
23-04-09, 12:04
What foundation do you have to support your hypothesis ? ....


especially from a youngster who really should know better.


Glad it wasn't only me who found the question, well, strange. Bet you're glad you hit the send button when you did, Gareth-Lee, adnd before you added the jokes!

Lighten up guys - sensitivity comes from experience, which none of tend to have too much of when at University (or perhaps it was just me and GLS).

dave_clark
23-04-09, 12:04
sensitivity comes from experience.

and experience comes from beatings administered by your superiors :D

Toby Warren
23-04-09, 12:04
Jokes are one thing and making general sweeping statements about a potential negative trait - is a very different thing.

stuart3826
23-04-09, 12:04
Doesn't seem a huge problem to me. Rugby is the preferred winter sport of the English public school. Any public school Old Boys team probably has a majority of gay or bisexuals among its target population:wink:
OI!:mad: Sweeping generalisation, and completely unfair:mad:

truck'n'trailor
23-04-09, 12:04
GLS, in answer to your question, I don't think all the players are necessarily gay. As with most teams playing at the lower levels, I think they'll take just about anyone who wants to play when they have late drop-outs.

I know Kings Cross Steelers have a number of players who are not gay.

Your comment was just a little naive, though, but not as bad as perhaps some are making out.

Pablo
23-04-09, 13:04
My preference is to keep a lid on all sledging, regardless of its nature. I ATP players who make comments specifically designed to wind up their opponents, because I have found that to do so decreases the likelihood of problems in the long run. Try it and see if it works for you!

GabboC
23-04-09, 14:04
Some very sensitive comments!

Re the idea that gay people would prefer rugby less than straight people... There is clearly a genuine paucity of empirical evidence. But given the fact that we are debating/discussing the unique nature of teams with a gay/bi background, then isn't that subtle evidence that gay people are under-represented in rugby? Or is it perhaps more evidence that gay/bi people are much more liklely to keep their sexual preference to themselves, and they are as likely to play/appreciate rugby as the next person?

I can remember Ian Roberts giving an interview once where he said that he was fully aware he did not fit the 'gay mould' and that none of his gay friends had any interest in the game. He seemed to ask the same question as GLS. And look at him now! He almost killed Lois Lane!

GabboC
23-04-09, 14:04
I should add that it was Ian Roberts who almost killed Lois Lane. GLS had nothing whatsoever to do with it.

TheBFG
23-04-09, 14:04
I should add that it was Ian Roberts who almost killed Lois Lane.

I thought it was Lex Luthor almost killed her :chin: :wink:

GabboC
23-04-09, 14:04
Yeah, Ian Roberts is now an actor - played Luthor's henchman in the latest Superman.

TheBFG
23-04-09, 15:04
Yeah, Ian Roberts is now an actor - played Luthor's henchman in the latest Superman.

Only one Luthor, Gene Hackman!!!

Lee Lifeson-Peart
23-04-09, 15:04
Is this what you mean?

694

TheBFG
23-04-09, 16:04
impressive considering the temperature!:o

backrow
23-04-09, 16:04
Beckett50
Having refereed the only openly gay team in the RFU without any problems I think that you are creating problems before they arise.

there is a very openly gay team playing in the lower levels in Manchester, go by the name of Village Spartans and are based around the Gay village of Manchester. I think the kit is orange and purple based, never managed to ref them due to injury or other commitments when appointed and not thru any fobia.:cool:

dave_clark
23-04-09, 16:04
is Manchester considered to be a gay village nowadays?

andyscott
23-04-09, 17:04
is Manchester considered to be a gay village nowadays?
Not sure but I can think of plenty of other names for it :D

Bungle
23-04-09, 18:04
I have known the Steelers for a long time, reffed them a few times when I was starting out with the whistle and have even played for them when they were short - and not once was there any kind of abuse you fear. There have been incidents in the past with one particular team but they are known throughout Essex for their 'ungentlemanly' approach to all other teams, gay, straight, black, white, ugly, pretty (not many of those in Essex...)

One incident does spring to mind which was rather ironic. The Steelers were playing that Manchester side (that orange kit was so ugly it sticks in the mind) and the only bit of abuse was between two long-playing straight guys - one on each side, winding each other up using the usual banter. It never occured to either of them that the other bloke might be gay. It got so bad that in the tunnel at the end there was fisticuffs between them. Suffice it to say the gay members of the team looked on with bemusement...

Everything Big J says about their warm welcome, friendly banter and good spirit I can endorse. Indeed, I have been requested to do a friendly for them next month and I have even got myself a London pink shirt for the occasion. I know they will enjoy it...

One thing about gay rugby per se (and as other have said no club is strict about 'gays only', they will welcome all players so long as they are comfortable with the ethos) is that it does offer people who would have liked to learn to play rugby earlier in life a second chance to have a go. Many players I spoke to have a love of the game but never felt confident enough at school or to get involved in a local club. They appreciated that a club would offer skills training from scratch and a gentle introduction with appropriate games. This means their 2nd and 3rd XVs often get trounced by more experienced sides but I know of many players who have come a long way, hold their own in County League rugby, feel involved in the game and contribute a lot to our rugby family.

OB..
23-04-09, 19:04
We've all been there, and there is no such thing as a silly question.
On that basis, it seems reasonable for andy to ask about the possibilities inherent in a situation he was not familiar with. He now has some (fairly firm!) answers. I am puzzled that some people seem to think he should not have asked.

dave_clark
23-04-09, 20:04
There have been incidents in the past with one particular team but they are known throughout Essex for their 'ungentlemanly' approach to all other teams, gay, straight, black, white, ugly, pretty (not many of those in Essex...)



is that a dog i hear? :D

Jacob Mayer
04-06-09, 20:06
Stumbled across this thread and thought I'd chime in as an "insider".

The Phoenix Storm are an inclusive, primarily gay team. We compete at the associate level in the Arizona Rugby Union, and we're also members of IGRAB, the international board which oversees gay rugby.

I've only seen what I'd call objectionable behavior on one or two occasions, and in each case, a nice firm tackle usually corrected the perception. :D

We're certainly not the best team in our union, but as some have alluded, we do throw the best third half in the state!

For those that don't know, or are curious, IGRAB has about 40+ member clubs from North America, Europe, and Australia. Many field two or more full sides, and a several are competitive at the division level within their union. We get together every two years for the Bingham Cup (named after Mark Bingham, one of the men who tried to take back Flt. 93 on 9/11/01) to compete in what I'm told is the largest amateur rugby event in the world (others will have to confirm that) with about 800+ players converging in Dublin last June.

I appreciate the comments here, and as a newbie to the forums will sit down and be quiet now whilst absorbing more wisdom from the rest of you... :Zip:

Best Regards,

Jacob Mayer

Phil E
04-06-09, 22:06
Jacob

Welcome to Rugby Refs and I hope you feel you can join in the discussions. We all learn something, no matter what our level, from every discussion, even if we don't all agree.

Dublin eh? That must be one hell of a party :biggrin: :bday:

andyscott
04-06-09, 22:06
Jacob, thanks for your input.

It was an interesting challenge, that in the end, didnt come to anything. The game was cancelled due to lack of numbers.

Andy

ExHookah
04-06-09, 23:06
Jacob,

I refereed at the Bingham in NY a couple of years ago, and it was fantastic. Honestly the only downside to the event was that at that point in time the pitches on Randalls Island in NY were absolutely shocking. (now after millions in investment the rugby pitches on Randalls are fantastic)

The tournament was without a doubt the best organized I've seen, and this was with three divisions of teams. There were tents for all teams to serve as locker rooms, and the final of the cup division was watched by a crowd of 1,800 very loud fans and players.

The hosting club had arranged a ton of media coverage, a massive amount of sponsorship, and some huge parties in Manhattan. The next time the Gotham Knights are hosting the tournament I will be happy to referee it again.

Jacob Mayer
27-05-10, 22:05
The next Bingham Cup is about 3 weeks out; in Minneapolis this year at the National Sports Center. Attendance is expected to be down a bit, but still nearly 600 players from what I've heard.

2012 should take us back to London or to Sydney. Woohoo!

Mich the Blind Side
28-05-10, 11:05
There are always somethings that will affect a player. I had a schools derby game where a lad had lost his mum recently and an opponent who knew situation provoked him with a "your mother" joke making the 13 year old cry. I had him replaced for remainder of the game whereas if he made it normally I probably would have given him a warning. Spoke to coach after game and the young fella apologised to him privately after the game.

Banter is well and good and you dont want to single out a player who might already be uncomfotable but I take a strict line to on-pitch bullying.


Personally I don't think homophobic comments should be tolerated at all. To me they are on a par with racist comments and should be treated the same. Everyone has a right to play this sport and I believes that referees are one of the pillars that protect that right. If I heard it on the pitch I'd RC it. If I heard one of my young players use it they would be given a severe talking to and a repeat would mean they would be looking for another club.

Yep, somewhere there’s a difference between banter and bullying; in Donal’s case it’s clearly bullying and he’s right to take a strict line. Especially with kids, the ref has an even greater duty of care to the players; see it as a sort of parental role on the pitch.

But it’s difficult to draw a really clear line. Fran Cotton’s exhortation to the players of the North during the All Blacks haka; ‘look at those big poofs dancing’ can’t really be taken as a reference to gay players; it’s a bit of a taunt to call the opposition soft. I’ve told my players to ‘flatten that big girl’s blouse’ in the past, while not giving a stuff about the sexuality of the player concerned; am I then being homophobic? Someone deliberately hurling insults at a player who is known to be gay is a different matter, and that’s where I find myself in agreement with Staybound; it’s essential to demonstrate that rugby has grown up and developed beyond the traditional demographic and is truly open to anybody who wants to play a team game.

So deliberate bullying, racism, homophobia or other forms of discrimination are out; banter and the occasional naughty word that’s not directed at an individual are part of the game. I guess it will remain up to common sense to decide what’s what.

However, in the case of refereeing an openly gay team, I’d say it makes the short pre-match chat with the captains essential; just make it clear what will and will not be accepted; that’s fair for all concerned.

It's an important issue to me; I'm not gay, but have gay clubmates, and I'm involved in promoting rugby via my club in a 'minor nation', where we need to make every new player, from whatever background, feel welcome at the club and in the sport; quite simply, we want the game to grow here. Anything that makes people feel unwelcome in our game makes it that much harder to persuade people to have a go and to persuade parents to bring their kids along to the club to try youth rugby.

crossref
28-05-10, 11:05
There's something different about a gay player in a team, and a 'gay team'.

In the first case the player's sexuality seems to me irrelevant... He's just a rugby player and rugby isn't about your sexuality it's about, well rugby. If someone else on the field makes a thing about it, I'd tell them to leave it out.

But In the second case - a gay rugby club. Well now suddenly sexuality has been brought directly onto the rugby field. It's the gay team that is now making a thing about it. Which is odd. Egregious even.

I am old enough to remember the rugby world being cut in two when teams finally woke up to S Africa and refused to play teams that were selected on racist principles. To be honest I would have to think hard about a new club calling itself London Blacks (even if there were some non-black players in it)

I am just not sure that it moves us in the right direction - to a place where we are colour, and sexuality blind.

Mich the Blind Side
28-05-10, 12:05
There's something different about a gay player in a team, and a 'gay team'.

In the first case the player's sexuality seems to me irrelevant... He's just a rugby player and rugby isn't about your sexuality it's about, well rugby. If someone else on the field makes a thing about it, I'd tell them to leave it out.

But In the second case - a gay rugby club. Well now suddenly sexuality has been brought directly onto the rugby field. It's the gay team that is now making a thing about it. Which is odd. Egregious even.

I am old enough to remember the rugby world being cut in two when teams finally woke up to S Africa and refused to play teams that were selected on racist principles. To be honest I would have to think hard about a new club calling itself London Blacks (even if there were some non-black players in it)

I am just not sure that it moves us in the right direction - to a place where we are colour, and sexuality blind.
Erm, difficult one. I think on the whole that gay rugby teams are a good thing, IF they are bringing people to the game who would otherwise feel unwelcome. If on the other hand they are taking in players whoíd be perfectly welcome at any other club itís a different matter.

I think in the future we might see the gay rugby clubs actually just becoming Ďnormalí rugby clubs, as social taboos are broken down and people start to see Kings Cross Steelers and the like as Ďthe local rugby clubí and just join because theyíre nearby.

Both gay clubs and other clubs will hopefully move toward complete integration and it shouldnít be an issue in the future. Iím an optimist about these matters and I see this is as a little sidestep on the way to the try-line instead of a run in the wrong direction. The try line being a game that is truly blind to colour, sexuality, religion and nationality.

crossref
28-05-10, 12:05
One thing in that mitigates toward gay clubs in rugby, specifically as opposed to other sprots, is that rugby clubs have a long tradition of being organised around a common interest or heritage.

In other sports clubs were almost invariably simply location based. In rugby we have that, but we also have Old Thiswegians and Old Thatschoolians, there is the Civil Service and the Police, and of course the nationality based clubs - London Irish, Welsh and French and Nigerians. And so on.

All of those have their origins in a certain sort of old-fashioned exclusivity that would no doubt seem very odd to us if we weren't so used to it. Perhaps having a gay club is part of this tradition.

But still: we also suffer in rugby from being under-represented amongst some ethnic minorities - but don't think anyone would suggest that setting up a race-based club was a good idea, we all much prefer to integrate so...

It's complicated.

But as a ref it's easy: ref what you see in front of you.

Phil E
28-05-10, 12:05
The try line being a game that is truly blind to colour, sexuality, religion and nationality.

Gonna make Internationals a bit difficult isn't it? :chin:

Mich the Blind Side
28-05-10, 12:05
Gonna make Internationals a bit difficult isn't it? :chin:

No. We now live in a world where many, many people migrate from one country to another. I know that some people take issue with that, but I think rugby has been quite admirable in stepping beyond the old concepts of nationality; let the politicians sort out the immigration stuff and letís just enjoy the game together. Weíve seen South Africans, New Zealanders and a Tongan playing for England, Englishmen playing for New Zealand, Australians playing for Japan and Georgians playing for France. I donít have a problem with that at all; people move to another country and then grab the chance to represent that country in a sport. Iím originally English, but if I had the chance to play for the Dutch national team I would grab that chance. Doesnít make me less English, it just shows that in more ways than one Iím Dutch as well.

Letís keep rugby cosmopolitan and worldly please.

dave_clark
28-05-10, 13:05
and of course the nationality based clubs - London Irish, Welsh and French and Nigerians.

anyone know exactly how many london exile clubs there are? i don't, so looked it up. this might not be a definitive list, but in addition to the above i found:

New Zealand
Cornish
Irish (amateur)
Scottish
South African

probably more too.

whoever said London is an inclusive city was clearly talking bollocks. well, in rugby terms anyway :)

Mich the Blind Side
28-05-10, 13:05
anyone know exactly how many london exile clubs there are? i don't, so looked it up. this might not be a definitive list, but in addition to the above i found:

New Zealand
Cornish
Irish (amateur)
Scottish
South African

probably more too.

whoever said London is an inclusive city was clearly talking bollocks. well, in rugby terms anyway :)

Yep, but I know that London Irish is an open club these days; donít know about the others.

Phil E
28-05-10, 13:05
Letís keep rugby cosmopolitan and worldly please.

Your irony meter is bust. :rolleyes:

crossref
28-05-10, 13:05
I think all of those teams are nowadays (and probably always were) a mixture of people who are of that heritage + their mates + locals

Mich the Blind Side
28-05-10, 13:05
Your irony meter is bust. :rolleyes:I play rugby in Holland, and have done for 15 years; we just don't have issues with players' nationality, sexuality or any other part of their background here, at least certainly not at my club or the other two clubs where I played.

I would hope that English rugby has reached that point too, but maybe it can only ever be a reflection of society.

Phil E
28-05-10, 14:05
I play rugby in Holland, and have done for 15 years; we just don't have issues with players' nationality, sexuality or any other part of their background here, at least certainly not at my club or the other two clubs where I played.

I would hope that English rugby has reached that point too, but maybe it can only ever be a reflection of society.

I think you have had your sense of humour removed as well?

I made a (probably crap) joke about "how can you have International matches if you are blind to Nationality".

I then got a lecture on the morals of English rugby :confused:

Mich the Blind Side
28-05-10, 14:05
I think you have had your sense of humour removed as well?

I made a (probably crap) joke about "how can you have International matches if you are blind to Nationality".

I then got a lecture on the morals of English rugby :confused:

Seeing as I can't hear your tone of voice or see your face, it's a bit difficult to judge if you're being humourous.

But sorry, I interpreted your chin rubbing smiley as 'thinking seriously about this', when you may have meant 'just joking'.

SimonSmith
28-05-10, 14:05
Assume it's the default setting for Phil


Oops, forgot the :biggrin:

Phil E
28-05-10, 14:05
Seeing as I can't hear your tone of voice or see your face, it's a bit difficult to judge if you're being humourous.

But sorry, I interpreted your chin rubbing smiley as 'thinking seriously about this', when you may have meant 'just joking'.

Yes, just joking.....:biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:

My bad.

Ian_Cook
28-05-10, 21:05
Doesn't seem a huge problem to me. Rugby is the preferred winter sport of the English public school. Any public school Old Boys team probably has a majority of gay or bisexuals among its target population:wink:

That would place a lot of gay men fairly and squarely in the England teams of the amateur era, where the school you attended was a major part of the selection criteria :D

I think it would be tricky to form an "all gay" team given the PC times we live in. How would you advertise for players, stating that to be accepted you must be gay, when you could bw leaving yourself open to accusations of sexual discrimination against "straight" players?

woody
29-05-10, 03:05
In my neck of the woods, for a couple of years, 2 out of the 8 teams in DIII were gay. There was never a problem. It took about 5 years for one to become competitive and the other had to fold.

As Jacob claimed about his club, the socials were the typically quite good. At one in particular, even the gay club joked they may have gone a little over the top. The social was in a rainbow bar with a ranch fountain. It was also humorous that the club had to have a practice where they only worked on boat races. It's one thing to get beat 100-5, but then you better not lose a 5-man boat race by 3. :swet:

Phil E
29-05-10, 09:05
The social was in a rainbow bar with a ranch fountain.

Is that a euphemism for something?

You're going to have to explain :confused:

PeterH
29-05-10, 10:05
Is that a euphemism for something?

You're going to have to explain :confused:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRGkgzJ9HYg

??:confused:

Dickie E
29-05-10, 12:05
Letís keep rugby cosmopolitan and worldly please.

Indeed. If a chap wishes to insert his old fella into another chap's back passage, it should have no influence on his choice of sport. This is 2010, after all. :nono:

dave_clark
29-05-10, 12:05
very eloquently put Dickie :)

woody
29-05-10, 16:05
Is that a euphemism for something?

You're going to have to explain :confused:

Everyone knew the team was gay. The rainbow painted bar in downtown with every beer sign in the place with rainbows was a reminder. Having a ranch fountain (thanks for the example Peter) at a rugby social (especially when it was not put on by women or where minors were allowed), well I haven't seen that with any other team. :biggrin:

Good times were had by all. And they finished 1.5 back in the boat race. :)

Davet
29-05-10, 17:05
DickieE - so long as the owner of the back passage is also happy with the situation

madref
29-05-10, 20:05
Hi

I have refereed Village Spartens a couple of times, great set of lads and give as good as they get!

Dickie E
30-05-10, 02:05
DickieE - so long as the owner of the back passage is also happy with the situation

so if you're not happy with it you can't play rugby? Might explain the paucity of prison teams :biggrin:

OB..
30-05-10, 10:05
Might explain the paucity of prison teams :biggrin:

Nobody took the bait! :wink:

Dickie E
30-05-10, 11:05
Nobody took the bait! :wink:

give it time - good things come to those that wait

chbg
30-05-10, 23:05
I understand that shower gel and shampoo bottles are forbidden.

Dickie E
31-05-10, 07:05
I understand that shower gel and shampoo bottles are forbidden.

I guess soap-on-a-rope would be out of the question :wow:

Davet
31-05-10, 12:05
Aussie, convicts, prison jokes... no idea where this is leading.

Hey, Bruce fancy a shag?

I do now, yer smooth talking son of bitch!

do I really need to bother with a "joking" icon?

Oh - yeah, Chopper might see this...:wink:

B52 REF
31-05-10, 17:05
Agree with Big J- treat any abuse as you would racist abuse-recognise banter for what it is (the clue is usually the recipient falling over in mirth).
Steelers are a delight to ref- i did possibly their biggest ever game in the cup-an oppo prop had declined to partcipate- his losss and as his coach said FR comp. was such he had probably ruled himself out for rest of season. Did my normal breif re discipline being skips responsibility including normal line "if anyone gets their handbags out you calm them down.."-both skips in stitches steelers skip quick as flash "no worries sir we tend to leave them with the valuables.""

Browner
20-09-14, 12:09
https://au.news.yahoo.com/a/24844581/aru-announces-new-inclusion-policy-ahead-of-bingham-cup/
How long before other Unions follow the ARU lead?
Surely the Bingham Cup's aim must be to eventually cease through lack of need?

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/aug/31/sydney-convicts-retain-gay-rugby-world-cup
"Inclusive" !?! IGRAB membership seems to be a prerequisite and that's hardly inclusive.

Interesting commentary on this thread , 4+ years further on.

Phil E
20-09-14, 12:09
A four year old thread?
You have way too much time on your hands!

Browner
20-09-14, 22:09
A four year old thread?
You have way too much time on your hands!

Not really, searched Bingham Cup, found it in 3 secs !

Taff
20-09-14, 23:09
Sick. Stories like these genuinely make me wonder do I ever want children...
Children will obviously be immature and lack the social skills adults are meant to have. Some will say something before engaging the brain, but will usually be pulled up by more mature team mates. I know that when I was a young and dull school kid, I did and said things to a classmate I wouldn't dream of saying now. Ironically we became pretty good mates after we both left school, although I've since lost touch with him. Adults are meant to be better, but having spoken to a couple recently, if I'm honest some of the things the mother said made me think their kids were more sensible and mature than she was.

Personally, I don't see any harm in mentioning it in the PMB. What's the harm in preventing any probable problems before you take the pitch? One side is "openly gay" and their opponents are "usually chirpy" come on, you just know that some clown is going to say something thinking he's clever / funny.