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tim White
21-07-06, 15:07
I frequently admit never having seen a law book when I was a 'player'. We all think we know the laws, get a short chat at the start of each season about any changes and then leave it to the ref.

I know this is true of many players even now, does it ring any bells?;)

OB..
21-07-06, 16:07
Before I started playing, my father bought me a little book entitled "Why the whistle went", an early RFU attempt to explain the complexities of the laws to the layman.

As a player I would ask questions about the laws, and even look things up.

I was a freak.

SimonSmith
21-07-06, 16:07
"Was".....? ;)

SONA
24-07-06, 14:07
Before I started playing, my father bought me a little book entitled "Why the whistle went", an early RFU attempt to explain the complexities of the laws to the layman.

As a player I would ask questions about the laws, and even look things up.

I was a freak.
My team, where I first learned to play in 1978 (University of Oklahoma) issued us the same book, Why the Whistle Went. I bet your edition is older than mine though. :D

OB..
24-07-06, 16:07
A quick google reveals that the booklet went through several editions. I found one copy labelled "Sixth Edition 1958". I obviously had the EW Kann edition published in 1947, since I started playing in 1949. (By chance I have a copy of the laws from that year in an old Playfair annual.)

I particularly remember a Fougasse cartoon of a group of Tibetans gathered round a rugby ball trying to work out how to play the game simply by reading the laws. I thought they were written in Tibetan too, at first.

SONA
24-07-06, 17:07
You started playing when? were you in your 20's in 1949? :D

OB..
24-07-06, 23:07
Cheeky!

In my day you started playing the full 15-a-side game when you went to senior school at eleven. A quick calculation will tell you that I am now 68. (Today, in fact.)

Simon Thomas
25-07-06, 23:07
I never once read the Laws as a player. First time I ever saw a Law Book was at my NFC course at the age of 42 !

Deeps
26-07-06, 00:07
When I were but a lad, HM Queen despatched me to the colonies for three years to help our American cousins find their way. Whilst at a party to which I had not been invited, where funny smelling tobacco was being enjoyed by many, it transpired by my accent that I appeared to hail from a rugby playing nation. There then followed an early version of the did I play rugby, do bears defecate in the woods conversation which lead to me getting involved in what became the Charleston Outlaws RFC.

Coached by Oxbridge Rugby Blues in the 15 a side game since the age of 11, with a father who had played for Oxford just after WWII and later to referee himself, I had a good working knowledge of the game as all good schoolboys should. Now hoisted by my own petard and to my chagrin I became coach, referee and by default captain of the 2nd XV. I wrote to Twickenham in a panic asking for a written version of the laws of the game so that at least one of us had some idea. Back came a tiny buff coloured booklet and HQ's best wishes in my efforts to tame the natives.

That started off my refereeing career which, later in life, I was able to consolidate formally with a qualification. I am delighted that the Charleston Outlaws RFC are still a force to be reckoned with and that a former playing colleague still appears on their roster. I am only sorry it took me so long thereafter to do it properly but then marriage, two wars, the Northern Ireland conflict, three children, and a vain hope of promotion all required my undivided attention. I am very pleased that my qualification now allows me to escape the rigours of the real world, like shopping, transporting children from A to B then to C and back to A via D, and the numerous brushfire wars that have occurred after my watch, if only for the odd afternoon.

SONA
27-07-06, 12:07
.. which lead to me getting involved in what became the Charleston Outlaws RFC.

DEEPS I have been refereeing the Outlaws since 2000. :D I am sure we know some mutual contacts. I am due to attend an exchange to your area in the fall. Cheers from the Dark Side.

Deeps
27-07-06, 23:07
I am due to attend an exchange to your area in the fall.

Next time you are in Charleston, say hi to Mike Christ for me.

Incidentally in another thread you were asking about weather conditions somewhere oop North in November. Do you realise just how far that is from my neck of the woods? I guess that would take what...at least 5 hours to drive that far. I would have to get permission to cross County lines, fill the gas tank to almost full and ask for a packed lunch - and that's just one way!

SONA
27-07-06, 23:07
:eek: :eek: :eek: Then I have no idea where you are and where I am going, all very American, or Italian if I were Christopher Columbus. :)

ex-lucy
28-07-06, 15:07
in my experience 5hrs aint much in USA rugby terms. In Michigan, there were about 7 teams, so a 4hr journey to play away was quite average. So, Detroit v Traverse City or Toledo (OHio but in Detroit's league) meant meeting on a Friday @ 5, travelling in convoy, playing Sat, party, waking up some time Sunday, travelling back. Every other weekend. Joy!!

Deeps
28-07-06, 19:07
in my experience 5hrs aint much in USA rugby terms.

I think 7 hours was the furthest I drove in the USA for a game. I had a VW (aircooled of course) 12 seater bus filled up with players and groupies. After the game one of the groupies rented a motel room and we all used the shower before the after game party and the long drive home at 55 mph of course.

My earlier post is perhaps a tongue in cheek view on just how we see distances in the two countries. Anything over an hour's travel in the UK is a long way (mentally), unlike the all day commitment needed more often than not in the USA.

SONA
30-07-06, 00:07
My a lot of you guys have played in the US!

My longest travel for one game was when I was in Univeristy at Oklahoma University and went 7 hours one way for a game in New Mexico. After that a drive to Colorado, Kansas or Texas didn't seem that far. :D

ExHookah
01-08-06, 14:08
I think 7 hours was the furthest I drove in the USA for a game. I had a VW (aircooled of course) 12 seater bus filled up with players and groupies. After the game one of the groupies rented a motel room and we all used the shower before the after game party and the long drive home at 55 mph of course.

My earlier post is perhaps a tongue in cheek view on just how we see distances in the two countries. Anything over an hour's travel in the UK is a long way (mentally), unlike the all day commitment needed more often than not in the USA.

Don't worry, I caught the tongue in cheek part of that post.

For this weekend:

Thehookah:
Start address: Norwalk, CT
End address: Danbury, CT
Distance: 22.4 mi (about 43 mins)
and then:
Start address: Danbury, CT
End address: Saranac Lake, NY 12983
Distance: 260 mi (about 5 hours 17 mins)

Chris Picard:
Start address: Middletown, CT
End address: Danbury, CT
Distance: 51.1 mi (about 1 hour 3 mins)
and then:
Start address: Danbury, CT
End address: Saranac Lake, NY 12983
Distance: 260 mi (about 5 hours 17 mins)

Judah Boulet:
Start address: Providence, RI
End address: Saranac Lake, NY 12983
Distance: 307 mi (about 5 hours 41 mins)

and north of the border Bryan Arciero:
Start address: St John's, NL A1C 6L3
Canada
End address: Saranac Lake, NY 12983
Distance: 2,918 km (about 3 days 4 hours)

I'm thinking Bryan might be flying some of that distance however!