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Thread: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

      
  1. #11

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nigib View Post
    He can't go back 4.9m and be legal - law says either ON the offside line at hindmost foot, or back 5m - stops them shuttling to and fro I guess.
    Who HAS to stay ON the offside line? Behind the line is fine. So go back 4.9m and you can come forward again. Go back to 5m+ and you stay at least 5m back.

    That's the difference.

    I do agree that it is outdated.
    Be reasonable - do it my way.

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    Pinky, I'm going to have to disagree with you on this. I will attempt to explain the interpretation give to me, by more learned people than I, of what the law is trying to say.

    The diagram below is one we have all seen many times, and shows 3 offside lines for the blue players. I'm going assume we are all reasonable happy with the 2 outer offside lines relating to blue.

    Now for the pesky middle offside line, this line is slightly different to the other two as it marks a line that the furthest the scrum half can go towards their own try line and still be part of the scrum. Once the scrum half has crossed this line they are no longer part of the scrum and so are offside until they cross the uppermost blue offside line.

    Further to this, if the scrum half does decide to stay on this offside line they must stay near the scrum, and must remain on the same side (moving to the other side is deemed as overstepping the offside line and is penalisable (this is clearer in the pre-simplified version of the law book).

    Scrum_Offside.jpg

  3. #13

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    Pablo I don't think this is right.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    I agree with ElPablo. The scrum half can't hover 2m behind the back foot (or 4.9m) - he's left the scrum and needs to retire.

    They sometimes do this when they're expecting the ball to be run off the back row, but not sure which side it's coming. You effectively have a loose, unbound defender floating around in front of the defensive line.

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    The point is that when he gets to the back foot he can then move latererally across the pitch, keeping to that offside line

    I don't see any reason why he couldn't stand 1m behind that line if he wanted to (of course he won't want to )
    Last edited by crossref; 24-11-18 at 08:11.

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    Because that is the law - per law 19.30, he either retires to a point *on* the offside line at the hind foot, or *at least 5m* behind it.

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich_NL View Post
    Because that is the law - per law 19.30, he either retires to a point *on* the offside line at the hind foot, or *at least 5m* behind it.
    oh yes

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elpablo73 View Post
    Pinky, I'm going to have to disagree with you on this. I will attempt to explain the interpretation give to me, by more learned people than I, of what the law is trying to say.

    The diagram below is one we have all seen many times, and shows 3 offside lines for the blue players. I'm going assume we are all reasonable happy with the 2 outer offside lines relating to blue.

    Now for the pesky middle offside line, this line is slightly different to the other two as it marks a line that the furthest the scrum half can go towards their own try line and still be part of the scrum. Once the scrum half has crossed this line they are no longer part of the scrum and so are offside until they cross the uppermost blue offside line.

    Further to this, if the scrum half does decide to stay on this offside line they must stay near the scrum, and must remain on the same side (moving to the other side is deemed as overstepping the offside line and is penalisable (this is clearer in the pre-simplified version of the law book).

    Scrum_Offside.jpg
    Elpablo, I do not agree with you that the "middle" offside line is as you describe it an on-side line. In the autumn international there have been a number of occasions where SH have left the side of the scrum and been told by the ref to be behind the back foot. I remain of the view that the 5m line only applies when the SH does not line up at the scrum at all.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    Pinky, I think we will have to agree to disagree about this; I'm of a firm belief one way and you have a different one. I don't see me getting you to change your interpretation, and that's fine. These are the nuances that make our game special.

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    Default Re: Where can the non-throwing SH go after ball thrown-in ?

    While the ball is still in the scrum, both scrum halves effectively follow the ball through the scrum up to a point.

    If it is won with the put in the opposing scrum half cannot then come round and advance the other side. If it is won against the head ( as if!) the scrum half with the put in cannot then himself go round and advance the other side.

    surely it's as straight forward as that?

    which s/h in their right mind would give up 5 metres? For me it's a lateral line across the pitch and is just there to ensure the s/h on the side losing the strike cannot close down on the other side.
    Last edited by ChuckieB; 27-11-18 at 00:11.

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