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Thread: Penalties and keeping track of them

      
  1. #11

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    Default Re: Penalties and keeping track of them

    Quote Originally Posted by Shelflife View Post

    I spoke to another ref who suggested that I let the situation breathe for a second, I tend to blow quickly for say not rolling away at a ruck when another second the ball is available anyway and I then have the option of advantage if they really slowed down the ball or just playing on, having a word with the offending player at the next down time.

    I tried this on Sunday and it def kept my pen count down without denying the non offending team the ability to play the ball.

    Something to work on I suppose.
    I'd say you identified the issue right there. It seems to be your "material effect" that you need to work on, of when to blow or when to play away, and think less about the count.

    If possible try and get your games videos and you can then see how quick you're on the trigger and how technical you might be. Then compare that with your better/higher referees in your area and what they "let go" and learn from them.
    Last edited by menace; 6 Days Ago at 22:12.
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  2. #12
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    Default Re: Penalties and keeping track of them

    Quote Originally Posted by Shelflife View Post
    Hi Dickie

    Ive no problem with the 3 or 4 in quick succession, its the ones that just seem to rack up without any real trend. so you could have Red holding on, then blue in at the side, then blue high tackle, red playing a man in the line out all nicely spaced out in the first 20mins.
    TBH, that sounds like players seeing what they can get away with.

    I used to deliberately look for things to penalise at the first few breakdowns and would probably give four or five penalties at the first ten breakdowns - and would shout particularly loudly about what they were for - no waiting or letting it breathe.

    It gave the message to players that I was a strict referee and they wouldn't get away with anything, so they wouldn't try. After setting my stall out, I'd let the game breathe much more.

  3. #13
    Slowing down these days

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    Default Re: Penalties and keeping track of them

    Quote Originally Posted by DocY View Post
    TBH, that sounds like players seeing what they can get away with.

    I used to deliberately look for things to penalise at the first few breakdowns and would probably give four or five penalties at the first ten breakdowns - and would shout particularly loudly about what they were for - no waiting or letting it breathe.

    It gave the message to players that I was a strict referee and they wouldn't get away with anything, so they wouldn't try. After setting my stall out, I'd let the game breathe much more.
    I like the sentiment with this. Just be aware that there is a risk of seeming to be inconsistent with this approach.
    "Ref - But you pinged us for it in the first 10 mins . Why not now ? "

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Penalties and keeping track of them

    Yeah, I'd get really annoyed with this approach as a player. You'd be more lenient with an offence in the last 10 mins than the 1st 10 mins. Seems to be inconsistent to me. I ref from the word go the same standard/tolerance that I do up till I blow the final whistle.

  5. #15

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    Default Re: Penalties and keeping track of them

    Quote Originally Posted by Arabcheif View Post
    Yeah, I'd get really annoyed with this approach as a player. You'd be more lenient with an offence in the last 10 mins than the 1st 10 mins. Seems to be inconsistent to me. I ref from the word go the same standard/tolerance that I do up till I blow the final whistle.
    Im with AC on this really. I also get "why" its done. Conxeding 3 points for a "hard line" PK in the opening minute is just as important as overall gakme context as conceding 3 points in the last minute.

    Of course in te same vein, one could ask if teams will run the ball from their own 22 in the last minute why dont they in the first ?

    didds

  6. #16

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    Default Re: Penalties and keeping track of them

    Quote Originally Posted by DocY View Post
    TBH, that sounds like players seeing what they can get away with.

    I used to deliberately look for things to penalise at the first few breakdowns and would probably give four or five penalties at the first ten breakdowns - and would shout particularly loudly about what they were for - no waiting or letting it breathe.

    It gave the message to players that I was a strict referee and they wouldn't get away with anything, so they wouldn't try. After setting my stall out, I'd let the game breathe much more.
    There is a skill to being really strict in the first 10 minutes - setting out your stall - and then relaxing the approach.

    Yous should only relax the approach, if you are being seriously strict in the opening quarter, if the players are responding. If they are not then this gives you early chances to

    It was said to me when starting out that the tough approach should be employed at the start of the match and after half-time. The problem comes in the second half when replacements are made and much of your good work can come undone by the arrival of the new players; this is why fitness is key as your mind will be sharp and aware of the risks of new players. Don't be afraid to pull back on the 'leniency' if the game is becoming problematic.

    Remember also that the Captains have a responsibility in this area and you need to emphasise this to them if the the Penalty starts to run away again.
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  7. #17

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    Default Re: Penalties and keeping track of them

    I don't think I adjust my standards, I think my tendency to play advantage may change a bit.

    You always want a couple of "statement penalties" you can make. Not rolling away, off feet, middle of the park. Really C&O - ping in. Don't even think about advantage unless a try is about to happen. Use downtime to reinforce what you need to see at that phase.
    26th minute, I may be tempted to breathe a sec to see if something is on before I blow the penalty.
    But the decision making process is still the same:
    1.Is that penalty-worthy offence or not?
    2. If yes, decide whether or not to play advantage.
    3. If no, play on.

    Steps 1 - 3 are the same the whole way through the game. Question 2 may get short shrift in the first 5
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