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Account Deleted
22-01-14, 12:01
http://www.irb.com/newsmedia/mediazone/pressrelease/newsid=2069969.html#irb+approves+trial+rugby+goggl es

matty1194
22-01-14, 15:01
E74 or roughly £60 for a pair, I have a few friends who tried contacts to stay playing and never really got used to them who would definitely be getting this link.

Phil E
22-01-14, 15:01
Unions are required to participate in the trial before a player under its jurisdiction can participate in the trial.

................over to you RFU?

Simon Thomas
22-01-14, 15:01
The player has to have confirmation of need by a qualified ophthalmologist (or similar medico), and it is a single online supplier to buy from and any player using them has to be registered on IRB Passport.

And here is the best bit. "Only those Rugby Goggles bearing the IRB trial-approved logo can be worn with referees empowered to make the necessary checks."

No doubt it has all been passed to the Editor of Touchline to make the decision for the RFU

Taff
22-01-14, 16:01
... And here is the best bit. "Only those Rugby Goggles bearing the IRB trial-approved logo can be worn with referees empowered to make the necessary checks."
Check for what exactly?

Sounds like the sound of an arse being covered to me.

Phil E
22-01-14, 16:01
Check for what exactly?

Sounds like the sound of an arse being covered to me.

Check for an IRB logo.
If it has that its approved.

TheBFG
22-01-14, 16:01
Check for an IRB logo.
If it has that its approved. = Arse covered :booty:

Browner
22-01-14, 17:01
Ok so ....... I buy goggles & now my son can now play whereas before he couldn't :pepper: I register to provide feedback [all good so far] , But say these goggles cause injuries to other players :shrug: & I know that if I provide this feedback to the IRB then my son might be stopped from playing ........... Q? will I provide the feedback? Will I log the injuries or track their long term effects....Will the referee report back such findings to the RFU---> IRB? if the answer to either of these is no, then what?............................. Or ............. should this be an 'already known & pre-determined outcome' trial?

crossref
22-01-14, 18:01
I haven't seen these but I expect them to be no more rigid or hard than a scrum cap.
also goggles pose a potential risk to the wearer - limited field of view, choke hazard from the strap. they'll want feedback on that.

Taff
22-01-14, 19:01
Check for an IRB logo. If it has that its approved.
Mmmm. But as there's only 1 supplier worldwide, every single one should have an IRB logo surely.

Ian_Cook
23-01-14, 03:01
Ok so ....... I buy goggles & now my son can now play whereas before he couldn't :pepper: I register to provide feedback [all good so far] , But say these goggles cause injuries to other players :shrug: & I know that if I provide this feedback to the IRB then my son might be stopped from playing ........... Q? will I provide the feedback? Will I log the injuries or track their long term effects....Will the referee report back such findings to the RFU---> IRB? if the answer to either of these is no, then what?............................. Or ............. should this be an 'already known & pre-determined outcome' trial?

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/98915197/RugbyRefs/Mountains-Molehills.jpg

Basketball has been using soft-goggles for over 30 years. If there has been an injury caused by them, I have certainly never heard of one.

Browner
23-01-14, 03:01
http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4577345473807676&pid=15.1&H=117&W=160

Account Deleted
23-01-14, 08:01
Mmmm. But as there's only 1 supplier worldwide, every single one should have an IRB logo surely.

There are a number of suppliers of goggles. The point it that these are the ones that are "approved" by the IRB. Or at least they are until the end of the trial.

RobLev
25-01-14, 14:01
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/98915197/RugbyRefs/Mountains-Molehills.jpg

Basketball has been using soft-goggles for over 30 years. If there has been an injury caused by them, I have certainly never heard of one.

Remember though that basketball is (theoretically) non-(or limited-)contact - certainly the gogggles wouldn't routinely come into violent contact with an opponent, whereas they will in rugby.

Account Deleted
25-01-14, 18:01
What happens to the people who buy these goggles and take part in the trial if the IRB says: " No thanks! the trial is not a success you can't wear them again!" What a waste of money.

L'irlandais
25-01-14, 19:01
To Browner,
I wish these had been around a few years back, my daughter would have gotten more value out of her Rugy license over 3 or 4 seasons. If there was ever a problem (injury or otherwise) I'd still be happy to provide feedback. It'd be pretty small-minded to relegate the safety of others to a distant second place, for the sake of my child's enjoyment. I feel most of the other club mini/midi/maxi coachs would do the same.

That said, there's a more cynical edge to some of the Senior coachs, so I cannot speak for them. :shrug: £60 isn't going to break the bank, is it? It's like buying a pair of "wonder" boots, which turn out to be useless ; what are you going to do, carry on wearing them because you paid good money for them or buy yourself a decent pair of boots?

Account Deleted
25-01-14, 20:01
For many £60 is not a lot. for some, on top of the rest of the kit it is a concern. Surely the IRB should commission and fund the trial and not leave it to little Johnny's parents to buy them.

At least with boots you can sell them second hand. Who is going to buy second hand "discredited" and "illegal" goggles?

Browner
25-01-14, 21:01
[QUOTE=L'irlandais;264648]To Browner,
I wish these had been around a few years back, my daughter would have gotten more value out of her Rugy license over 3 or 4 seasons. If there was ever a problem (injury or otherwise) I'd still be happy to provide feedback. It'd be pretty small-minded to relegate the safety of others to a distant second place, for the sake of my child's enjoyment. I feel most of the other club mini/midi/maxi coachs would do the same.

QUOTE]
By definition you're likely to be a 'responsible/ in tune with the greater good' person, aware of the impact of such. Would you be confident that all the buyers of these goggles would have the same thought process' ? ........ The wear'ers parents [if they mirror the actions of most parents I've seen most weekends ] won't likely be that worried about the effect on anyone other than their Jonny. Hey I'll add another thought into the mix... IRB sanctions one manufacturer - wow that's a nice exclusive contract ..... Raleri must be well connected ! Ps, I wasn't a cynic until I found mummy & daddy were the Tooth Fairy & Santa respectively. :shrug:

L'irlandais
25-01-14, 22:01
Hi Browner,
At this time on a Saturday night, I'm generally worse for wear ; but I'll answer you : I've already put "Jonnie's" parents right on this common misunderstanding. If they're less understanding than most, a punch in the face usually straightens thing out! Usually, your milage may differ. ;)

Ian_Cook
25-01-14, 22:01
Remember though that basketball is (theoretically) non-(or limited-)contact - certainly the gogggles wouldn't routinely come into violent contact with an opponent, whereas they will in rugby.

If you believe basketball, or netball for that matter, are non-contact sports then you are living in cloud cuckoo land. I have not played basketball, but I used to play indoor netball in a mixed league (played in a totally enclosed indoor cricket arena) and I can honestly say I have never come off a sports court or field feeling so battered and bruised as regularly as I have after playing indoor netball. The girls are particularly brutal, with a surreptitious/accidental forearm or elbow in the face being not that uncommon.

Browner
25-01-14, 23:01
If you believe basketball, or netball for that matter, are non-contact sports then you are living in cloud cuckoo land. I have not played basketball, but I used to play indoor netball in a mixed league (played in a totally enclosed indoor cricket arena) and I can honestly say I have never come off a sports court or field feeling so battered and bruised as regularly as I have after playing indoor netball. The girls are particularly brutal, with a surreptitious/accidental forearm or elbow in the face being not that uncommon.

Of course ........ collisions in your netball match [or basketball] will equal those that happen in rugby .... silly us thinking otherwise

L'irlandais
25-01-14, 23:01
Browner,
Mulhouse has a Hallball team of renown (http://www.mhsa.fr/home/). Our rugby first XV will never be renowned, as sad as that may be.
When I go to watch a handball match, I see a contact sport requiring courage. When I Watch our 1st XV it's not quite so inspiring.


Would you mind telling us what position you played? I never shirked a tackle at left-wing, (never mate, broken wrists for my entire 'O" levels 'n all) yet I don't think I'd want to play Handball, no thanks!

To be honest, I reckon I'd see you, Beretta 'n all ; unarmed, my friend. On the grounds that, if you need some hardware, you can't be all that tough!

ChrisR
26-01-14, 01:01
2778

My guess is the user gets to insert his own lenses in the obvious places. Assume lens material conforms to some code?

I think I'd recommend user to also wear a scrum cap so the'd be less likely to get dislodged.

Jarrod Burton
26-01-14, 05:01
Trust me, netball is a sport for brave players, especially at the top levels. I've umpired matches where there have been broken legs and wrists; seen massive, legal contact between players where I've had to stop the match and order a girl off the court with suspected concussion and a lump on the head the size of a ping pong ball only 30 seconds after the contact; and bloodied noses and cuts on faces from head to head contact, yet we allow goggles and glasses in lower grades. There is just as much contact in netball and basketball, we just don't go on with it in rucks and mauls etc.

Browner, I've found many girls in netball willing to put their bodies on the line more than some of the guys I've reffed in rugby - and netball is played on concrete/solid floors.

If the visor/goggles are shatter proof and the frame soft, then go for it. I, like marauder, would like to see a scrum cap to hold them in place, or better still, be built into a scrum cap to minimise the chance of them being dislodged down and becoming a choking hazard.

Ian_Cook
26-01-14, 09:01
Trust me, netball is a sport for brave players, especially at the top levels. I've umpired matches where there have been broken legs and wrists; seen massive, legal contact between players where I've had to stop the match and order a girl off the court with suspected concussion and a lump on the head the size of a ping pong ball only 30 seconds after the contact; and bloodied noses and cuts on faces from head to head contact, yet we allow goggles and glasses in lower grades. There is just as much contact in netball and basketball, we just don't go on with it in rucks and mauls etc.

That certainly matches my personal experience, especially in the Indoor version where there is is no "out". The ball can be passed and played off the side, end and top nets. The action is fast and continuous.

In rugby, you are prepared for the hit because its part of the game; in netball the hit may not be as severe but they can come unexpectedly and from any direction.

NOTE: Netballers could teach rugby players a thing or two about putting an unmarked player into a gap!!!

menace
26-01-14, 11:01
2778

My guess is the user gets to insert his own lenses in the obvious places. Assume lens material conforms to some code?

I think I'd recommend user to also wear a scrum cap so the'd be less likely to get dislodged.

Admittedly I've not seen them 'in the flesh' but they still look quite rigid, and if they are, I'm sorry but I just can't see how these can be safe for the wearer or their opposition? Unless they're as soft as ski goggles, or slip off if the contact is super tough/rough (therefore i think te ability for them to dislodge can help reduce their potential danger) then I can't see how it won't eventually cause some injury.

RobLev
26-01-14, 13:01
If you believe basketball, or netball for that matter, are non-contact sports then you are living in cloud cuckoo land. I have not played basketball, but I used to play indoor netball in a mixed league (played in a totally enclosed indoor cricket arena) and I can honestly say I have never come off a sports court or field feeling so battered and bruised as regularly as I have after playing indoor netball. The girls are particularly brutal, with a surreptitious/accidental forearm or elbow in the face being not that uncommon.

Since the only broken bone I've had was inflicted in a netball match between my fencing club and a Croydon Young Mothers team, I'm fully aware that the "theoretically" I put in my original post is justified. Nevertheless, if I dive headfirst (the head being where the goggles are located) at the ball carrier playing rugby nobody bats an eyelid - in basketball and netball the whistle should blow.

Again, if you end up with a pile of 7 bodies from each team in netball, someone is committing an offence (offside at minimum) - but in rugby we call it the later stages of a ruck.

In rugby, your head/face routinely and legally comes into contact with an opponent's body many times a match; that is not the case in basketball or netball.

ChrisR
26-01-14, 14:01
The purpose of the trial is discovery. I'm wondering what position the referee should take if an opponent objected to them.

Ian_Cook
26-01-14, 18:01
Since the only broken bone I've had was inflicted in a netball match between my fencing club and a Croydon Young Mothers team, I'm fully aware that the "theoretically" I put in my original post is justified. Nevertheless, if I dive headfirst (the head being where the goggles are located) at the ball carrier playing rugby nobody bats an eyelid - in basketball and netball the whistle should blow.

Again, if you end up with a pile of 7 bodies from each team in netball, someone is committing an offence (offside at minimum) - but in rugby we call it the later stages of a ruck.

In rugby, your head/face routinely and legally comes into contact with an opponent's body many times a match; that is not the case in basketball or netball.

All the same, I think Browner's post was somewhat over the top in that he was awfulizing. If these goggles are as soft as I have been told, I don't see how they could cause injury any more than a scrum cap could.


The purpose of the trial is discovery. I'm wondering what position the referee should take if an opponent objected to them.

The same attitude that he should take if someone objected to an opponent's scrum cap; check for the iRB approved logo. If it's present, objection overruled!

Browner
26-01-14, 20:01
Browner,

Would you mind telling us what position you played?
To be honest, I reckon I'd see you, Beretta 'n all ; unarmed, my friend. On the grounds that, if you need some hardware, you can't be all that tough!

Mostly 8 [6... or even 7 in my youth 'or' on really soft pitches !]. We'll never know.... xx, but if it helps you, I concede.:love:

SimonSmith
27-01-14, 14:01
The purpose of the trial is discovery. I'm wondering what position the referee should take if an opponent objected to them.

Guidance is that (assuming they are legal) a player who objects to playing against an opponent wearing them may recuse himself from the match

ctrainor
27-01-14, 19:01
So at this moment in time they are not legal in england correct?

On the netball front it is a tough sport.
I few years ago I participated in a works sports day for my then company RO Defence part of the BAE Systems group at loughborough university.
one of the sports was mixed Netball and we had proper referees/Umpires.
Played against a welsh team from Glascoed in the final and we beat them despite them having 2 county players.
We worked out that we could pass the ball rugby style up and down the court only taking the one step.
Despite protests the Umpires ruled what we were doing was legal theough we did get pulled up a bit for contact.
Happy days and still undefeated champions as that was the last year we did it........dmn you overhead cutbacks!!!

Blackberry
18-02-14, 19:02
I'm OK with goggles, but bearing in mind the swathe of weather cancellations, could the IRB trial snorkels as well?

Jenko
31-03-14, 23:03
So at this moment in time they are not legal in england correct?

On the netball front it is a tough sport.
I few years ago I participated in a works sports day for my then company RO Defence part of the BAE Systems group at loughborough university.
one of the sports was mixed Netball and we had proper referees/Umpires.
Played against a welsh team from Glascoed in the final and we beat them despite them having 2 county players.
We worked out that we could pass the ball rugby style up and down the court only taking the one step.
Despite protests the Umpires ruled what we were doing was legal theough we did get pulled up a bit for contact.
Happy days and still undefeated champions as that was the last year we did it........dmn you overhead cutbacks!!!

latest from RFU


Background
As you may be aware, the RFU and Constituent Bodies have received a number of complaints over the last season relating to the prohibition on sports goggles in all contact rugby at all ages. Discussions and considerable efforts have therefore been taking place internally for some time and the RFU has been liaising closely with the Association of British Dispensing Opticians to develop a practical solution to provide a wider degree of flexibility to enable great social inclusion in Rugby Union.
The RFU has therefore decided to introduce in England a trial that would enable the wearing of certain sport goggles (dispensed under professional supervision) by players playing contact rugby at the Under 13 age grade and below. This trial is a variation of the RFU’s current regulations which prohibits all types of goggles to be worn in contact rugby.
Whilst for the most part the trial will not take full hold until next season, the RFU recognises that some players may be in a position to adhere to the conditions of the trial in this current season. If this is the case, the RFU sees no reason why such players should be prevented from participating in the trial this season, provided all of the trial conditions are satisfied.
To this end, the trial will commence with immediate effect and will last until the end of the 2014-15 Season, whereupon the position will be reviewed further.
Conditions of the trial
The trial will permit players playing contact rugby at the Under 13 age grade and below to wear specially designed and manufactured sports goggles subject to the following conditions (all of which must be met):
(a) The sports goggles must be dispensed by a registered dispensing optician who is a member of the Association of British Dispensing Opticians* (“ABDO”); and
(b) The player must have written confirmation from the ABDO dispensing optician that the sports goggles:
i. Are required to correct the vision of the player or are required to protect the player’s eyes due to a medical condition, to enable the playing of Rugby Union; and
ii. Do not substantially restrict any normal field of vision and are suitable for use in evasion contact sports; and
iii. Do not constitute a physical danger to the player or other players; and
(c) The match referee is entitled to object to the player wearing the sports goggles if the referee reasonably believes that they are unsafe; and
(d) Clubs must notify the RFU Legal Officer of all players participating in the trial by emailing AlysLewis@rfu.com; and
(e) Clubs must report any injuries caused as a result of the sports goggles to the RFU Community Medical Team by emailing sportsinjuriesadmin@therfu.com and the player’s parents must report the injury to the ABDO dispensing optician who prescribed the goggles.
*If an optician is registered with the Association of British Dispensing Opticians, the optician will be listed on the General Optical Council’s list of registered members which is available at http://www.optical.org/. Please check the list by inserting the name of the individual optician or opticians practice.
Onward communication
In light of the number of upcoming festivals (including CB festivals), we wanted to inform Constituent Bodies, the ERSFU and the Referee’s Union as soon as a decision was made and in advance of the rest of the Game so that you have the opportunity to raise any queries directly with us if you so choose.
In due course, we will be notifying clubs of the implementation of the trial but should you wish to inform your clubs directly in the meantime, the RFU would have no objections to that.
Queries
Should you have any queries or require further clarification and guidance in relation to the proposed trial, please contact Alys Lewis .

Browner
01-04-14, 11:04
A complex/data collection system is a great dissuader for reportees ...... ah ha ...rumbled!

Match inspection
little Jonnie wearing his goggles at the kit inspection.
parent stood alongside with ABDO letter (yeah right!).
Goggles arent broken, so i deem safe.
I collect the ABDO letter, which is returned to the parent at the end of the match ONLY if there are no injury's caused by Goggs

Works for me.

Ps....But hold on a cotton-pickin minute !!!!!!, that letter doesnt have a description/photo of the actual googles issued, so how do I know that the ones Jonnie is wearing are bonafide goggs....... ????? Sorry parent, I'm vulnerable here, Jonnie don't play. ????

crossref
01-04-14, 11:04
latest from RFU

I actually received that email, as well :)
:pepper:

crossref
01-04-14, 11:04
A complex/data collection system is a great dissuader for reportees ...... ah ha ...rumbled!

Match inspection
little Jonnie wearing his goggles at the kit inspection.
parent stood alongside with ABDO letter (yeah right!).
Goggles arent broken, so i deem safe.
I collect the ABDO letter, which is returned to the parent at the end of the match ONLY if there are no injury's caused by Goggs

Works for me.

Ps....But hold on a cotton-pickin minute !!!!!!, that letter doesnt have a description/photo of the actual googles issued, so how do I know that the ones Jonnie is wearing are bonafide goggs....... ????? Sorry parent, I'm vulnerable here, Jonnie don't play. ????

how likely is it that a parent would go to the trouble of getting a legal pair of goggles ... and then replace them with an illegal pair?

didds
01-04-14, 11:04
Ok so ....... I buy goggles & now my son can now play whereas before he couldn't :pepper: I register to provide feedback [all good so far] , But say these goggles cause injuries to other players :shrug: & I know that if I provide this feedback to the IRB then my son might be stopped from playing ........... Q? will I provide the feedback? Will I log the injuries or track their long term effects....Will the referee report back such findings to the RFU---> IRB? if the answer to either of these is no, then what?............................. Or ............. should this be an 'already known & pre-determined outcome' trial?

IIRC its not for you as a parent to tell the RFU.

The parents role is to report it to your optician - the club informs the RFU.

however... your points otherwise are equally valid!

didds

didds
01-04-14, 11:04
and the likelihood is as a society ref you are probably unlikely to ref a game with a goggled player.

its more likely to be a coach of his/the oppo team.

didds

Browner
01-04-14, 12:04
IIRC its not for you as a parent to tell the RFU.

The parents role is to report it to your optician - the club informs the RFU.

however... your points otherwise are equally valid!

didds
Didds, tut tut.
You know that my earlier posting was referring to the IRB trial, and therefore shouldnt be referenced to this latest RFU trial posting.

I'm not overly concerned by the latest Goggs trial....... But I do see a trend in rugby administration which is this...
A plethora of regulations, varied by age/competition etc with an increasing burden on referees to be the library of rule checking / playing compliance....

Its a Liability avoidance drafting strategy, and if others can't see so, then all fool them.

As for GOGGS?, when he turns up then he'll play, provided he isn't wearing long underwear or blades that don't meet regs either !!!!

Wolrabs
14-05-14, 08:05
Hi,

So is the IRB trial for any age group? And the RFU email pertains to U13's and below?

What does the IRB Mark look like?

I reffed an U15 game where one of the captains tried to wear a pair of spectacles. As he walked off the pitch to remove them, one of his team said that he should have brought his goggles. I said that he wouldn't be allowed to wear those either. Quoted the relevant regulation and all.

Is this going to cause confusion with refs not knowing about the trial. I certainly surprised me.

Lee Lifeson-Peart
14-05-14, 08:05
Hi,

So is the IRB trial for any age group? And the RFU email pertains to U13's and below?

What does the IRB Mark look like?

I reffed an U15 game where one of the captains tried to wear a pair of spectacles. As he walked off the pitch to remove them, one of his team said that he should have brought his goggles. I said that he wouldn't be allowed to wear those either. Quoted the relevant regulation and all.

Is this going to cause confusion with refs not knowing about the trial. I certainly surprised me.

:wtf:

Wolrabs
14-05-14, 10:05
:wtf:

He was most put out when I told him to remove them.

didds
14-05-14, 11:05
did by any chance "Last week's ref allowed me to wear them?"

??

Yeah, right!

didds

Lee Lifeson-Peart
14-05-14, 13:05
I'm staggered you needed to tell him.

Has he worn them before?

Who refereed that game?

Does he train in them?

Who's coaching him?

It sounds unbelieveable - I fact, I don't believe you - there see told you! :biggrin:

crossref
14-05-14, 14:05
Hi,


Is this going to cause confusion with refs not knowing about the trial. I certainly surprised me.

this is one thing which the RFU have properly documented on the website, for all to see.
:clap:
google [RFU goggles] and it finds it

http://www.rfu.com/takingpart/playerhealth/faqs

Wolrabs
14-05-14, 15:05
The IRB say for every level of rugby but the RFU say for U13's and below.....So which one has precedence or will there be squabbles on the pitch?

Simon Thomas
14-05-14, 17:05
The IRB say for every level of rugby but the RFU say for U13's and below.....So which one has precedence or will there be squabbles on the pitch?

RFU (or any other 'home union') has precedence under their delegated powers to pro-actively adopt local variations from the IRB global position, in implementation of such guidelines / advisory situations where trials are involved.

Pinky
15-05-14, 00:05
We got details of the IRB trial sent round earlier in the season by the refereeing authorities. Details are here http://www.irb.com/newsmedia/mediazone/pressrelease/newsid=2069969.html
This is different from the RFU arrangements which have been in place for longer and for younger players

Wolrabs
15-05-14, 17:05
So as the RFU guidelines /regulations take precedence over the IRB ones, then U13 and below are fine to wear the goggles, but U14 and above aren't.

Is this right? It makes sense in my head.

Pinky
18-05-14, 16:05
No, I think anyone is allowed to wear the IRB goggles as long as they are the correct ones and registered through the manufacturer. I think additionally in England U13 and below can wear a wider range of goggles (as approved by the RFU)

thepercy
19-05-14, 03:05
I had my first genuine rugby goggle sighting, no injuries or malfunctions to report.

Dickie E
19-05-14, 04:05
I wonder if they make your team mates appear better than they really are?

2871


Also not too sure about the binding by the Green hooker

john g
19-05-14, 09:05
No, I think anyone is allowed to wear the IRB goggles as long as they are the correct ones and registered through the manufacturer. I think additionally in England U13 and below can wear a wider range of goggles (as approved by the RFU)

So it's only people who are participants in the trial,you have to participate in the trial to purchase the goggles. Sorted.
Question. How long is the trial going on

Browner
19-05-14, 11:05
I had my first genuine rugby goggle sighting, no injuries or malfunctions to report.

Did you see his/her ophthalmologists letter?

Browner
19-05-14, 11:05
I wonder if they make your team mates appear better than they really are?

2871


Also not too sure about the binding by the Green hooker

Any comments Constantine 4eyesbetter crossref? ... Ie ....Should weighty women be subject to this? Maybe it was a photoshoot?!!

thepercy
19-05-14, 15:05
Did you see his/her ophthalmologists letter?

I did not. I didn't check for IRB logos on all the shock tops and scrum caps either.

crossref
19-05-14, 15:05
So it's only people who are participants in the trial,you have to participate in the trial to purchase the goggles. Sorted.
Question. How long is the trial going on

In england the RFU trial lasts until the end of the 2014/15 season.

http://www.rfu.com/takingpart/playerhealth/faqs

crossref
19-05-14, 15:05
No, I think anyone is allowed to wear the IRB goggles as long as they are the correct ones and registered through the manufacturer. I think additionally in England U13 and below can wear a wider range of goggles (as approved by the RFU)

No.

RFU Regulations are that no one can wear goggles
The RFU trial is a variation on the regs that allows U13 and below to wear the IRB approved goggles this seson and next

http://www.rfu.com/takingpart/playerhealth/faqs

Dixie
19-05-14, 17:05
No.

RFU Regulations are that no one can wear goggles
The RFU trial is a variation on the regs that allows U13 and below to wear the IRB approved goggles this seson and next

http://www.rfu.com/takingpart/playerhealth/faqs the iRB initiative post-dates the RFU one. It is not at all clear that the RFU position is as stated by Crossref, nor that the RFU can trump the iRB trial. This from the iRB website (http://www.irbplayerwelfare.com/goggles):

The IRB has developed a Global Law Trial to field test the Rugby Goggles’ design and obtain data for the purposes of developing a Rugby Goggles specification. The purpose of the field test is (i) to ensure that the Rugby Goggles perform as designed, namely that they provide players with a means of wearing corrective lenses safely during contact Rugby; (ii) to ascertain the suitability of the design for ease of use; and (iii) to ascertain if further specific field or laboratory tests are required.

...

The use of the Rugby Goggles is permitted in any game of Rugby. Any player who considers the risks inherent in playing with or against someone wearing the Rugby Goggles to be outside of acceptable levels of risk is free to choose not to participate in the game however the use of the Rugby Goggles is not grounds for preventing the wearer from playing in the game.

The success or otherwise of the Global Law Trial will determine whether Rugby Goggles will be permitted to be worn beyond the trial period and enable the IRB to provide a Rugby Goggles Specification. It is therefore essential that the IRB receives feedback from all those who elect to become part of the trial by purchasing and using a pair of the Rugby Goggles.

A global law trial would suggest to me that no individual Union can prevent its players from taking part. What sort of a global trial wouild it be if England, South Africa, France and NZ refused to let their players take part?

crossref
19-05-14, 18:05
hmm. I thought the RFU email that went out specifically referenced the IRB trial.
perhaps I have become confused !

but don't see it as unreasonable that each local Union might have to think about local health and safety laws/regualtions/environment before proceeding with the trial ?

Dixie
19-05-14, 20:05
hmm. I thought the RFU email that went out specifically referenced the IRB trial.
perhaps I have become confused !

but don't see it as unreasonable that each local Union might have to think about local health and safety laws/regualtions/environment before proceeding with the trial ?Crossref, the iRB trial is of just one style of goggles only available from the iRB, and not available at retail in any country of the world. The RFU trial, by contrast, permits players to wear any style of sports goggles upon the advice of their dispensing optician. The two trials are totally separate, and the iRB has not specifically sanctioned the RFU one - but nor does it have to.

As to H&S law - I doubt that H&S law in any country goes to such depth of detail that it would have something specific to say about the wearing of sports goggles in a contact sport when those goggles have been approved (whether on a trial basis or otherwise) by the sport's global governing body. Admittedly, the iRB's suggestion that a match official may not prevent the wearer from wearing the goggles may find itself in conflict with the broad obligations placed on people not to allow anything they themselves consider dangerous ... but these are the broad provisions relied on by the loony brigade to prevent cake stalls and bar-b-q at the village fete.

Wolrabs
19-05-14, 22:05
Hi.

So what does the IRB mark look like? Is it just their logo printed on the goggles? If a player turns up with the goggles, do they need to produce a confirmation from the IRB that they are on the trial, or is the letter from the Opthamologist sufficient?

Is there anywhere that has a list of participants that can be checked to ensure that the bearer of the letter match up? Will this be a requirement for the ref to check prior to the game? Or will it be at the Brief?

What if the player doesn't wear them until after the brief and turns up on the pitch with them?

If the players aren't part of the trial and they are U14 and above then they have to remove them?

Wow, lots to think about.

Browner
20-05-14, 10:05
I did not. I didn't check for IRB logos on all the shock tops and scrum caps either.

All that other padding is common, goggles are new and th4 rare, you're the first to post that you've come across them.

I'm untroubled by your choice to permit, was just wondering whether you'd tested the robustness of the trial system.

Did you simply recognise the Goggles as being Raleri ? or other?

Browner
20-05-14, 11:05
Hi.

So what does the IRB mark look like? Is it just their logo printed on the goggles? If a player turns up with the goggles, do they need to produce a confirmation from the IRB that they are on the trial, or is the letter from the Opthamologist sufficient?

Is there anywhere that has a list of participants that can be checked to ensure that the bearer of the letter match up? Will this be a requirement for the ref to check prior to the game? Or will it be at the Brief?

What if the player doesn't wear them until after the brief and turns up on the pitch with them?

If the players aren't part of the trial and they are U14 and above then they have to remove them?

Wow, lots to think about.

The onus in both sets of trials is for the wearer to demonstrate a) need and b) trial registration.
This means any bonafide wearer ( or parent) will have gone through a process of establishing what they need to do to qualify.
It is therefore entirely reasonable to expect them to have the letters with them, which in turn protects us.
So ... No Letter= no play ......surely ?

Dixie
20-05-14, 11:05
Hi.

So what does the IRB mark look like? Is it just their logo printed on the goggles? If you look at the photo appearing on about p.4 of this thread, I suspect that below the left eyepiece it says: "iRB trial approved".

Dixie
20-05-14, 16:05
This in an email from the RFU in response to a question posed in the light of Crossref's posts:


I appreciate that it must be confusing given the two different trials.

The RFU trial is different from the IRB trial. The RFU chose to not adopt the IRB trial because the advice of the Association of British Dispensing Opticians was that the goggles were not appropriate and they would be advising their opticians to not dispense the goggles. The RFU therefore decided that we could not adopt a trial when practically speaking, parents and players could not get hold of the goggles. This means that because the RFU has not adopted the IRB trial, no player in England is able to purchase the IRB goggles. The IRB trial is therefore not available to players in England.

However, working alongside ABDO, the RFU and ABDO has developed an alternative trial which does permit a wider range of goggles subject to certain conditions. Rather the limit the trial to one manufacturer’s goggles, the RFU’s approach is to leave that assessment and decision to the dispensing opticians who will prescribe a goggle that suits the needs and features of the child.

The main distinction between the two trials is that the RFU trial only applies to U13s and below at this stage. Whilst this is a positive development for u13s and below, we appreciate that it is not helpful for u14s and above, who are still prohibited to wear sports goggles in England. From a visual/optical perspective, it is not recommended for contact lenses to be prescribed to children under 12 years of age whereas u14s and above are more likely to be able to wear lenses and therefore have a few more options available. However, I appreciate that this does not cover off players who may need to wear goggles to protect a good eye.

The principle reason for not permitting goggles from u14s upwards is because the game becomes more intense, physical and escalates in terms of contact elements from this age therefore the safety implications and considerations are increased. We will continue to monitor the situation and in addition, we will be carrying out trials of a number of goggles in a controlled environment so it could be that the trial expands further in due course, and perhaps in advance of next season.

Please rest assured that we continue to work on this matter recognising that some children are still prevented from played and we hope to update the game further as soon as anything changes.


The iRB statement does state that a Union will have to participate in the trial before its players can use the goggles, but in light of that it is perhaops disingenuous to describe it as a Global Trial.

crossref
20-05-14, 17:05
interesting -- and it does show the practical difficulties in rolling out a global trial in different jurisdictions. British OPtician obviously have a different set of standards from some other countries. (and it would be surprsing if there aren't other countries with the same view)

The umpire
22-04-15, 19:04
Ian McKinley played for the Barbarians last night wearing the goggles. First I've actually seen of them.
More info on him and them, here

http://www.stmaryscollegerfc.com/News_And_Events_News.aspx?id=690

menace
23-04-15, 01:04
Rather ironic the picture was taken during a wet game....anyone not know rugby would think the backs wear goggles when it's wet to stop water getting in their eyes (and comb in left pocket). :pepper:

Browner
23-04-15, 20:04
Ian McKinley played for the Barbarians last night wearing the goggles. First I've actually seen of them.
More info on him and them, here

http://www.stmaryscollegerfc.com/News_And_Events_News.aspx?id=690

The writers article is certainly a powerfully persuasive reason for WR allowing them.

TheBFG
19-08-15, 16:08
I thought this had been given the OK???

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-33987947

Phil E
19-08-15, 16:08
I thought this had been given the OK???

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-33987947

You didn't read the whole article did you? :nono::nono::nono:


But the rules are different across the UK.

In Scotland children can play rugby while wearing goggles, and the Rugby Football Union in England started a trial of the eyewear last season when it received complaints after introducing a ban on them.

World Rugby, the game's global governing body, has been running a separate trial of goggles for players with sight problems at all levels of the game.

But the IRFU decided not to take part in the tests.